Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
  • 11-03-2016

    Una foresta di nonne e un quartetto silenzioso

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    Conversazione con Yuval Avital

    Lingua: italiano

    [Su "Alma Mater"]: Diciamo che "Alma Mater" è partita come un’indagine, un’indagine su un archetipo. Il più grande archetipo di tutti è forse quello della madre. Tutto in realtà è partito con una chiacchierata in cui un’amica ha suggerito di fare un festival al femminile. Lei mi ha chiesto, che cos’è per te la femminilità. Io ho detto, la mia nonna, le mie due nonne; farò una foresta di nonne. Io già in passato ho utilizzato questa formazione che chiamo "Massive Sonic Works", opera di massa sonora, in cui l’utilizzo del suono e dell’intensità, della quantità del suono lo rende materico; che è molto diverso del concetto dell’orchestra, in cui ci sono tanti e tanti colori e prismi ma devono formare una specie di gerarchia, una piramide. Invece qua è una cosa più da… da moschea, non so, da processione!
    Dopo un po’ ho capito che non sarebbe stato possibile. Avere questa utopia di questo campo pieno di nonne, che è forse una cosa un po’ surreale, non era fattibile. Allora ho detto, allora facciamo una foresta di altoparlanti, da cui escono voci di nonne. E così il primo strato di "Alma Mater" è una foresta di centoquaranta altoparlanti da cui escono centinaia di frammenti di voci, sussurri, fiabe, canti, ninne nanne, lamenti di nonne da tutto il mondo: la nonna lombarda e la nonna yemenita, afghana, inuit, i canti femminili…

    "Samaritani" è un’opera che entra nella categoria che io chiamo "opere iconosonore", opere che creano delle iconografie e utilizzano della musica ma anche il suono e il timbro per narrare un mondo. Il popolo dei Samaritani è un popolo unico, perché innanzitutto è un popolo molto piccolo: ha poco più di 900 persone. Ma risponde a tutte le definizioni possibili di un popolo: hanno la loro storia, millenaria, hanno la loro lingua, hanno la loro religione – chiamiamola "giudaica non ebraica".
    Dal punto di vista musicale c’erano vari episodi. Nelle parti in cui cantavano loro c’era il problema di come includere elementi vocali che non seguono né un concetto di altezza né di ritmica precisa. Malgrado ciò, se qualcuno sbaglia durante la cantillazione loro lo fischiano, sono peggiori dello zoccolo duro della Scala! Quindi ho dovuto creare come delle nuvole attorno alle voci e creare un rapporto di sfondo e protagonismo, che si poteva muovere in vari modi.

    "Silent Quartet" è nato quando Stefano Pierini mi ha chiamato e mi ha chiesto una nuova opera, e mi ha suggerito di parlare di migrazioni. La mia prima reazione è stato un rifiuto totale. Sai, da israeliano, la prima cosa quando sono venuto in Italia, mi hanno chiesto: Israele, Palestina, Olocausto; Israele, Palestina, Olocausto. A me questa cosa di fare "cartoline" non è mai interessata e non mi interessa tuttora. E quindi in realtà il rifiuto era anche una paura di queste cose. Poi mi è venuto in mente che, in realtà, parlando di migrazione, anche io sono un migrante… Quindi quello che ho fatto è chiamare tutte le persone vicine a me; c’è la signora delle pulizie di casa mia, la signora delle pulizie di un’amica, c’è un mio amico argentino che è andato a vivere in Israele e poi è venuto in Italia a fare il designer; poi un’amica giapponese che è un’artista manga; una professoressa di antropologia dalla Somalia… e avendo queste persone vicine a me mi sono sentito più a mio agio. E quindi ho creato una serie di, diciamo, interviste in silenzio, in cui loro non dovevano dire niente ma rivivere esperienze significative o pensieri significativi.

     

    Yuval Avital è un compositore, artista multimediale e chitarrista israeliano; vive e lavora a Milano. Il suo lavoro spazia da eventi sonori di grandi dimensioni per un grande numero di esecutori a composizioni orchestrali e cameristiche, da "opere iconosonore" che impiegano musicisti classici combinati con strumenti multimediali e esponenti di culture e tradizioni antiche a progetti altamente tecnologici, che coinvolgono scienziati, intelligenza artificiale ed elaborazioni sonore dal vivo, installazioni sonore, video e performance, anche in collaborazione con alcuni dei più grandi artisti, performers, registi e designers del nostro tempo. Durante la nostra conversazione abbiamo parlato di "Alma Mater", recentemente presentato alla Fabbrica del Vapore di Milano in dialogo con "Terzo Paradiso" di Michelangelo Pistoletto; di "Samaritani", definita "opera iconosonora" dedicata al minuscolo popolo mediorientale; di "Silent Quartet", la "storia di un viaggio", in cui un piccolo gruppo di migranti racconta, in silenzio, il proprio percorso; e di "Fuga Perpetua", il suo prossimo progetto, dedicato al tema dei rifugiati.

     

       Conversazione con Yuval Avital
    .

       Conversation with Yuval Avital

     

    .
    Yuval Avital, Alma Mater
    .
    Yuval Avital, Samaritani
    .
    Yuval Avital, Silent Quartet
    .

    Yuval Avital, Alma Mater
    Yuval Avital, Samaritans
    Yuval Avital, Silent Quartet

    A forest of grandmothers and a silent quartet

    In conversation with Yuval Avital

    Language: Italian

    [On "Alma Mater"]: I’d say "Alma Mater" began as an inquiry on an archetype. The greatest archetype of all is the Mother. It all started when, talking to a friend, she suggested an all female festival. She asked what femininity meant to me. “My grandma”, I answered, “My two grandmas; I will make a forest of grandmas”. I had already used this formation that I call “Massive Sonic Works”, where the use of sound and intensity, the quantity of sound, makes it materic; which is very different from the concept of an orchestra, where you have many colours and prisms, but they need a sort of hierarchy, a pyramid. In my case it is more a sort of…a mosque, I don’t know, a procession!
    After a while I realised it would not be possible. To have this utopic field full of grandmothers, slightly surreal, could not be done. So I said, let’s make a forest of loudspeakers, with voices of grandmothers coming out. This was the first layer of “Alma mater”, a forest of one hundred and forty loudspeakers with hundreds of fragments of voices, whispers, fairy tales, songs, lullabies, laments, from grandmothers all over the world: a Lombard grandma and a Yemenite grandma, Afghan, Inuit, female songs…

    “Samaritans” is a work that belongs to a category I call “iconosonic works”, works that create iconography and use music, but also sound and timbre, to relate a world. The Samaritans are a unique people, first of all because they are very few: a little over 900. But they are a people in every respect: they have their history, their language, their religion – we can call it “Judaic, not Jewish”.
    Under a musical point of view, there were many episodes. When they were singing, the problem was how to include vocal elements that do not follow any concept of pitch or rhythm. Nevertheless, when someone made a mistake while chanting, they hissed, they were worse than the loggionisti in La Scala! So I had to create some sort of clouds around their voices, creating a background/foreground relation, that could be shifted in various ways.

    “Silent Quartet” was born when Stefano Pierini asked me for a new work, suggesting it dealt with migrations. My first reaction was a complete refusal. You know, as an Israeli, the first thing I was asked when coming to Italy was: Israel, Palestine, Holocaust; Israel, Palestine, Holocaust. I was never interested in making “postcards”, as I am not today. This is why I refused, for fear of this kind of thing. But then I realised, talking about migrations, that I too am a migrant… So what I did was to call the people that surround me; the cleaning lady, the cleaning lady of a friend, my Argentine friend who went to live in Israel and then came to Italy to be a designer; a Japanese friend who is a manga artist; an anthropology professor from Somalia… with all these people close to me I felt at ease. So I created a series of, let’s say, silent interviews, where they did not need to say anything, simply relive meaningful experiences or thoughts.

     

    Yuval Avital is a composer, multimedia artist and guitarist from Israel; he lives and works in Milan. His works range from large scale sonic events for a great number of performers to orchestra or chamber music, from “iconosonic works” using classical musicians combined with multimedia instruments and prominent figures of ancient cultures and traditions to highly technological projects involving scientists, A.I. and live electronics, sound installations, video and performance, often in collaboration with some of the greatest artists, performers, directors and designers of our time. During our conversation we discussed: “Alma Mater”, recently presented at the Fabbrica del Vapore in Milan, together with Michelangelo Pistoletto’s “Third Paradise”; then “Samaritans”, an “iconosonic work” dedicated to this small community of Middle-Eastern people; then “Silent Quartet”, the “story of a journey”, where a small group of migrants tells, silently, their own itinerary; and then “Fuga Perpetua”, his upcoming project, dedicated to the topic of refugees.

     

     

  • 06-03-2016

    111 biciclette e 9 Harley Davidson - ritmi d'interazione in una città perfetta

    Bandiera EN

    English version

     

    Conversazione con Jörg Köppl

    Lingua: tedesco

    Mi sono occupato a lungo di prosodia, cioè con le voci, i ritmi e le melodie delle voci. In questo contesto il concetto di interazione tra i ritmi è diventato molto importante per me, perché ho notato che un ritmo è forse un modello che noi in qualche modo conosciamo, richiamiamo alla memoria, ripetiamo… ma forse è anche qualcosa che avviene tra due interlocutori. E questo avvenire tra due interlocutori ha una propria qualità che mi interessa molto dal punto di vista musicale. Questa idea dei ritmi d’interazione nasce proprio da questo scambio interpersonale, da questa interazione tra due voci, e dal desiderio di cercare cosa succede in una città, in un ambito più grande, cosa succede oggi, cosa succede nelle macchine, cosa succede nel traffico… tornando poi alle relazioni interpersonali. Come ci si può avvicinare a ciò musicalmente? Anche perché molti altri tipi di definizione di questo fenomeno hanno perso la loro credibilità.

    E l’energia di queste Harley Davidson – Schnebel era presente, ci ha fatto molto piacere – queste macchine, come un coro, è stato come un richiamo, una sveglia; si è creata un’energia che ha molto giovato all’intera serata. La “Brise”, “brezza”, di Kagel era… era una brezza, era così leggera… ha portato molto movimento, perché molta gente ha partecipato. La piazza aveva al suo centro una fontana, che abbiamo spento, e la gente era seduta di fronte a questa fontana e poteva guardare la strada, dove per esempio passavano le Harley Davidson, o dove si trovavano i musicisti.

    Il mio pezzo “Das Zürcher Modell” è alla base dell’intero progetto, perché mi interessava lavorare con questa idea del sistema di gestione del traffico. Mi interessava vedere cosa succedeva; è un sistema intelligente, è in grado di apprendere. Il sistema analizza i nodi del traffico in diversi punti della città e dà informazioni su come i tempi e le fasi dei semafori si devono modificare. Mi interessava l’aspetto matematico, algoritmico, e la sua complessità, perché immediatamente in questo sistema viene coinvolto un grande numero di persone. Ho preso dei dati dal traffico di Zurigo, i dati dei semafori della città su un periodo di due ore, e ho cercato di creare da questi “on” e “off” una musica, di assemblare dei suoni, di “colorare” i nodi del traffico, e di sviluppare una musica da queste ritmicità, con una tastiera elettronica, percussioni, corno e saxofono tenore.

    Il prossimo concerto si chiama “Sirren” e avrà luogo nella Borsa di Zurigo. Non ho nessun contatto con quello che succede là, per me è astruso; anche dal punto di vista temporale là si lavora con frequenze che per noi sono inimmaginabili. Nelle contrattazioni ad alta frequenza vengono utilizzate differenze temporali dell’ordine dei microsecondi per comprare o vendere qualcosa. Ci sono macchine che si inseriscono in queste differenze temporali, e l’importante è che le linee non abbiano nessun delay temporale; chi si trova logisticamente più vicino alla Borsa ha un vantaggio… è anche uno spazio non regolato, non c’è chiarezza, non si sa chi guadagna; deve trattarsi di un’enorme quantità di denaro, è come un film poliziesco. Sono molto curioso di vedere come la musica si inserirà in questa situazione… è anche un esperimento.

    “Lachen” (“Ridere”)… anche qui si tratta di un processo di sincronizzazione. Se si osserva il processo della risata, si nota che sono dei colpi, “ha-ha-ha”, con una struttura ritmica; e anche in questo caso quando due persone ridono davvero insieme si adattano l’uno all’altro, addirittura si sincronizzano. Qui abbiamo un pezzo di Takasugi, che ho sentito a Darmstadt e che mi è piaciuto moltissimo; è un pezzo molto intenso, ma che tematizza anche l’aspetto sociale, la “maschera” della risata, del sorriso. C’è un pezzo di Isabelle Klaus, che prende l’umorismo… davvero sul serio! E’ una prima mondiale. E poi abbiamo “Quasimodo, the great lover” di Alvin Lucier, dove il suono viene trasformato dagli spazi.

    Il tentativo è di scoprire cosa succede qui, proprio qui, davanti al mio naso, nella nostra vita quotidiana. Possiamo capirlo in modo diverso con la musica? Abbiamo perso qualcosa, e quel qualcosa che abbiamo perso ha a che fare con l’immagine paradisiaca che Zurigo ha per molte persone all’estero; Zurigo, la Svizzera, la ricchezza, la pulizia, la libertà… tutto caratterizzato da queste immagini… ma allo stesso tempo tutte queste attribuzioni portano anche ad uno straniamento. Per un’identificazione io ho bisogno anche delle zone d’ombra. Mi interessa anche coinvolgere le diverse persone e non accettare certe barriere che invece vengono accettate: i motociclisti delle Harley Davidson, il tecnico che si occupa degli algoritmi della gestione del traffico… queste persone caratterizzano la città, ne fanno parte.

    Jörg Köppl è un sound artist e performer svizzero, formato alla celebre Hochschule der Künste di Zurigo. Ha poi studiato composizione tra l’altro con Thomas Kessler all’Elektronisches Studio di Basilea, con Edu Haubensak e con Peter Ablinger. La lunga collaborazione con Peter Zacek lo ha portato a collaborare con rinomate istituzioni e festivals, tra l’altro a Parigi, Belgrado e Londra. Si è dedicato con interesse alla radio, creando progetti sperimentali presentati in festivals come Ars Electronica a Linz e la Bienal de Sao Paulo.
    Nell’ambito del progetto di ricerca NOW ha lavorato sui processi uditivi di percezione del tempo. L’osservazione delle interazioni melodiche e ritmiche nella voce parlata lo hanno condotto ad una concezione del tempo come elemento di sincronizzazione sociale. Nella stagione 2015-2016, come direttore artistico residente dell’ensemble Tzara di Zurigo, ha concepito e realizzato la serie “TZÜRICH – ritmi d’interazione in una città perfetta”, composta da tre eventi: “Pulsen”, “Sirren” e “Lachen”; questo progetto è stato l’oggetto della nostra conversazione.

    Conversazione con Jörg Köppl
    .

    Conversation with Jörg Köppl
    .

    dal progetto “TZÜRICH” – estratti da “Pulsen”:
    Dieter Schnebel: Konzert per 9 Harley Davidson, sintetizzatore e tromba
    Mauricio Kagel: Eine Brise – flüchtige Aktion per 111 ciclisti
    Moritz Müllenbach: Pas de deux, balletto per due spazzatrici stradali
    Jörg Köppl, Das Zürcher Modell
    .
    .
    project “TZÜRICH” – extracts from “Pulsen”:
    Dieter Schnebel: Konzert for 9 Harley Davidson, synthesizer and trumpet
    Mauricio Kagel: Eine Brise – flüchtige Aktion for 111 riders
    Moritz Müllenbach: Pas de deux, ballet for two road sweepers
    Jörg Köppl, Das Zürcher Modell
    .

     

    111 bicycles and 9 Harley Davidsons – interaction rhythms in a perfect city

    In conversation with Jörg Köppl

    Language: German

    I was long involved with prosody, that is with the voices, the rhythm and melodies of voices. In this context the concept of interaction between rhythms has become very important for me, as I noticed that a rhythm is maybe a model that in some way we know, that we recall to memory, that we repeat… but maybe it is also something that happens between two interlocutors. And that fact it happens between two interlocutors has its own quality that I find very interesting from a musical point of view. This idea of interaction rhythms is born exactly from this interpersonal exchange, this interaction of two voices, the will to find out what is happening in a city, in a greater environment, what happens today, what happens in cars, what happens in traffic… then getting back to interpersonal relations. How can this be approached musically? Also because many other types of definition of this phenomenon have lost their credibility.

    And the energy of these Harley Davidsons – Schnebel was present, we were very pleased – these machines, like a choir, was like a signal, a wake-up call; there was an energy that helped the whole evening. The “Brise”, Kagel’s breeze was… it was a breeze, so light… it brought a lot of bustle, because a lot of people took part. There was a fountain at the centre of the square, which we turned off, and the people were sitting in front of this fountain and could look at the street, were the Harley Davidsons were passing, or where the musicians were.

    My piece “Das Zürcher Modell” is the starting point for the whole project, because I was interested in working with this idea about the system for handling traffic. I was interested in what would happen; it is a smart system, it can learn. The system analyses the traffic hubs in various parts of the city and gives information on how the times and phases of the traffic lights must change. I was interested in the mathematical, algorithmic aspect, its complexity, because this system immediately involved a great number of people. I gathered data on the traffic in Zurich, the data from the traffic lights during two hours, and I tried to create music from these “on’s” and “off’s”, to assemble sounds, to “colour” the traffic hubs, to develop music from these rhythms, with a keyboard, percussions, a horn and a tenor sax.

    The next concert will be named “Sirren” and it will take place in the Zurich Stock exchange. I have no connection to what happens in there, I find it bizarre; from the time point of view they work with frequencies that are unimaginable. In high frequency trading they use time gaps of microseconds to buy or sell something. There are machines tapping into these time gaps, it is essential that the lines have not time delay; those who are closer to the Stock exchange have a head start… it is also an ungoverned space, there is no transparency, you don’t know who’s gaining; it must deal with huge amounts of money, it is like a thriller. I am really curious to see how the music will fit into this situation… it is also an experiment.

    “Lachen” (“To laugh”)… we have again a synchronicity process. If you analyse the laughing process you will find it is like beats, “ha-ha-ha”, with a rhythmical structure; and also in this case, when two people are really laughing together they adjust to one another, they even synchronise themselves. Here we have a piece by Takasugi, that I heard in Darmstadt and I really liked; it is very intense, but it thematises the social aspect, the “mask” of laughing, of smiling. There is a piece by Isabelle Klaus, she takes humour… really seriously! It is a world première. And hen we have “Quasimodo, the great lover”, by Alvin Lucier, where sound is transformed by spaces.

    My effort is to find out what happens here, right here, under my very nose, in our everyday life. Can we understand it differently with music? Did we lose something, and that something we lost, has it something to do with the heavenly picture the Zurich is for many people abroad; Zurich, Switzerland, wealth, tidiness, freedom… all characterised by these images… but at the same time, all these qualities carry an estrangement with them. For an identification I need a grey area. I am interested in engaging different people and not accepting certain barriers that are normally accepted: the Harley Davidson bikers, the specialist who deals with the algorithms that handle traffic… these people characterize the city, they are part of it.

    Jörg Köppl is a Swiss sound artist and performer, trained at the famous Hochschule der Künste in Zurich. He then studied composition with, among others, Thomas Kessler of the Electronic Studio in Basel, with Edu Haubensack and Peter Ablinger. His long collaboration with Peter Zacek brought him to collaborate with renowned institutions and festivals, in Paris, Belgrade and London, among others. He dedicated himself to the radio, creating experimental projects in festivals such as Ars Electronics in Linz and the Bienal de Sao Paulo.
    Within the NOW research project he worked on listening processes of time perception. The observation of melodic and rhythmic interactions in the spoken voice led him to conceive of time as an element of social synchronisation. In the 2015-2016 season, as Artistic Director of the Tzara Ensemble in Zurich, he conceived and realised the series “TZÜRICH – interaction rhythms in a perfect city”, composed of three events: “Pulsen”, “Sirren” and “Lachen”; this project was the subject of our conversation.

  • 07-11-2015

    Il suono collettivo

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    Fin da bambino sono stato istintivamente, emotivamente attratto dai suoni complessi, collettivi: le strida di uno stormo di uccelli, il pigolìo di un cesto pieno di pulcini, il grido e il canto più o meno sincronizzati di uno stadio colmo (e non ho nessun particolare interesse per lo sport!), la pioggia che batte su un tetto metallico… Come mi succede sempre con le cose che amo, non c’era nessun motivo razionale per questa mia attrazione; al contrario, è l’istintività della mia reazione a questa particolare categoria di suoni che mi ha portato, in seguito, a cercare di capire il perché di queste mie sensazioni.
    Di conseguenza è perdonabile l’ingenuità del mio entusiasmo quando, da ragazzo, nel pieno dell’ebbrezza del mio primo viaggio di studio a Parigi, ho letto in un volume acquistato in una libreria del VIème arrondissement queste parole:
    […] Per prima cosa gli eventi naturali come i colpi della grandine o della pioggia su superfici dure o ancora il canto delle cicale in un campo in piena estate. Questi eventi sonori globali sono fatti da migliaia di suoni isolati la cui moltitudine crea un evento sonoro nuovo sul piano dell’insieme. […] Tutti hanno osservato i fenomeni sonori di una grande folla di decine o centinaia di migliaia di persone durante le manifestazioni politiche. Il fiume umano scandisce uno slogan in un ritmo unanime. Poi alla testa della manifestazione viene lanciato un altro slogan, e si propaga verso la coda sostituendo il primo. In questo modo un’onda di transizione si propaga dalla testa alla coda. Il clamore riempie la città, la forza inibitrice della voce e del ritmo è al suo culmine. E’ un evento altamente potente e bello nella sua ferocia. Poi si produce lo scontro dei manifestanti con il nemico. Il ritmo perfetto dell’ultimo slogan si rompe in un ammasso di grida caotiche che, anch’esso, si propaga verso la coda. Immaginiamo inoltre il crepitìo di decine di mitragliatrici e il fischio dei proiettili che aggiungono la loro punteggiatura al disordine totale. Poi, rapidamente, la folle viene dispersa e all’inferno sonoro e visuale succede una calma lacerante, piena di disperazione, di morte e di polvere.
    Iannis Xenakis, Musiques Formelles
    In effetti tra i compositori che nel ventesimo secolo con più precisione si sono dedicati a questo aspetto ci sono proprio Iannis Xenakis e György Ligeti. Le “micropolifonie” di Ligeti sono un mezzo semplicissimo e straordinariamente efficace di organizzare e gestire un grande numero di piccoli eventi sonori, inserendoli in modo organico nel suono complessivo; Xenakis invece vi si è dedicato in modo forse ancora più intenso e specifico, con risultati musicali a volte meno immediati, ma con l’enorme merito di introdurre modi nuovi e più efficaci di pensare a questo tipo di eventi, per esempio attraverso l’uso della teoria della probabilità.
    Sicuramente questo è uno dei motivi principali per i quali il mio strumento è… l’orchestra: non esiste null’altro che possa offrire la possibilità di costruire con precisione e flessibilità nemmeno paragonabili un’organismo sonoro complesso e – appunto – collettivo.
    Un altro aspetto per me affascinante è che i suoni collettivi sono, per necessità logistica, distribuiti nello spazio. Ricordo con gioia un concerto dell’Orchestre Philharmonique de Bruxelles diretta dal visionario Michel Tabachnik, che prendendo spunto dalle indicazioni logistiche della partitura di Terretêkthor di Xenakis, aveva deciso di sparpagliare l’intera orchestra nello spazio vuoto delle Halles de Scharbeek a Bruxelles, sistemando inoltre alcune centinaia di sedie a sdraio nelle quali il pubblico poteva accomodarsi, trovandosi quindi in mezzo ai singoli strumentisti dell’orchestra. Il programma era estremamente variegato: oltre a Xenakis, c’erano alcune Canzoni e Sonate di Gabrieli, se non ricordo male nella trascrizione di Bruno Maderna, Lontano di Ligeti e l’Ouverture del Lohengrin di Wagner. Terrêtekthor veniva eseguito due volte, per permettere al pubblico di spostarsi e ascoltare il pezzo da due prospettive diverse. E’ uno dei concerti più interessanti ai quali abbia mai assistito; e la cosa per me paradossalmente più rivelatrice in quell’occasione è stata che, a mio parere, il pezzo che funzionava meglio in quel contesto era… Wagner. La sua scrittura orchestrale, estremamente omogenea e avvolgente, veniva esaltata dalla distribuzione nello spazio; al contrario, Xenakis e Ligeti risultavano in qualche modo più “frammentati”, rendendo peraltro possibile una affascinante serie di osservazioni nel momento in cui ci si spostava attraverso la sala.
    Ma questo tipo di intuizione musicale nasce ben prima di Ligeti e Xenakis. Tra i numerosi esempi disponibili vorrei scegliere Giuseppe Verdi quando già ne La Traviata, pochi istanti pima della morte di Violetta, fa suonare tutta l’orchestra, compresi ottoni, timpano e grancassa, il più piano possibile: “Questo squarcio benché a tutta orchestra dovrà eseguirsi pianissimo”. Non è per nulla una contraddizione: la tessitura, il colore di un pianissimo sono molto più densi, più intensi e più emotivamente coinvolgenti se il suono è eseguito collettivamente, mentre una riduzione dell’organico in quei punti avrebbe creato una trasparenza che, in quei casi, sarebbe stata di gran lunga meno efficace!

     

       La Brussels Philharmonic alle Halles de Schaarbeek a Bruxelles (foto: Virginie Schreyen)
    .

      The Brussels Philharmonic at the Halles de Schaarbeek in Brussels (photo: Virginie Schreyen)

     

    The collective sound

    Since I was a kid I instinctively, emotionally felt attracted by complex, collective sounds: the squeaking of a flock of birds, the cheeping of chicks in a basket, the more or less synchronized shouting and singing in a full stadium (and I’m not even into sports!), the rain on a metal roof…. As is usual with things I love, there was no rational cause for this attraction; on the contrary, the instinctiveness of my reaction to this kind of sounds led me to later investigate the reasons behind these feelings.
    I can therefore be forgiven my naive enthusiasm when, as a young man, in the exaltation of my first study trip to Paris, I found these words in a book bought in a bookshop in the VIème arrondissement:
    […] First of all, natural events such as the collision of hail or rain with hard surfaces, or the song of cicadas in a summer field. These sonic events are made out of thousands of isolated sounds; this multitude of sounds, seen as a totality, is a new sonic event. […] Everyone has observed the sonic phenomena of a political crowd of tens or hundreds of thousands of people. The human river shouts a slogan in a uniform rhythm. Then another slogan springs from the head of the demonstration; it spreads towards the tail replacing the first. A wave of transition thus passes from the head to the tail. The clamour fills the city, and the inhibiting force of voice and rhythm reaches a climax. It is an event of great power and beauty in its ferocity. Then the impact between the demonstrators and the enemy occurs. The perfect rhythm of the last slogan breaks up in a huge cluster of chaotic shouts, which also spreads to the tail. Imagine, in addition, the crackling of dozens of machine guns and the whistle of bullets adding their punctuations to this total disorder. The crowd is then rapidly dispersed, and after sonic and visual hell follows a detonating calm, full of despair, dust and death.
    Iannis Xenakis, Musiques Formelles
    Iannis Xenakis and György Ligeti are indeed among the 20th century composers who explored this aspect more specifically. Ligeti’s “micropolyphonies” are a very simple and extraordinarily effective means of organising a large number of small sound events, by inserting them organically in the resulting complex sound. Xenakis was, if possible, committed to an even more specific and intense investigation; his musical results were sometimes less immediate, but with the huge merit of introducing new and more effective ways of conceiving this kind of events, in particular through probability theory.
    This is certainly the reason why my main instrument is… the orchestra: nothing else can offer the opportunity to build a complex sound organism and, with unparalleled precision and flexibility, a collective one.

    Another fascinating aspect is that collective sounds are, for logistical reasons, spread out in space. I have a fond memory of a concert by the Brussels Philharmonic conducted by Michel Tabachnik who, following Xenakis’ indications in the score of Terretêkthor, decided to spread the whole orchestra in the empty space of the Halles de Scharbeek in Brussels, arranging hundreds of folding chairs for the audience, who would find themselves right next to individual orchestra musicians. It was an extremely varied programme: in addition to Xenakis there were some Canzoni e Sonate by Gabrieli, orchestrated by Maderna if I recall correctly, Ligeti’s Lontano and Wagner’s Lohengrin Ouverture. Terretêkthor was performed twice, to allow the audience to move and to listen to the piece from different sound perspectives. It was one of the most interesting concerts I ever sat through; and, paradoxically, the real revelation on that occasion was that the piece of music that worked out the best in that context was… Wagner. His orchestral writing, extremely homogeneous and enfolding, was enhanced by the spatial distribution, while Xenakis and Ligeti came out somehow as more “fragmented”, allowing nevertheless a fascinating series of observations as one moved through the hall.

    But we can find this kind of musical intuition long before Ligeti and Xenakis. Among the numerous examples I wish to single out Giuseppe Verdi in La Traviata: shortly before the death of Violetta, he has the whole orchestra, including brass, timpani and bassdrum, play as soft as possible: “This passage, although for the whole orchestra, will be performed pianissimo”. This is not a contradiction: the texture, the colour of a pianissimo are much more dense, stronger and emotionally captivating if the sound is performed collectively, while a thinning in the instrumentation would have created a transparency that, in that case, would have been way less effective!

  • 30-09-2015

    Il luogo dove avvengono le decisioni: l'arte e la polis

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    conversazione con Pietro Montani

    Lingua: italiano

    C’è la grande opportunità che si apre grazie alle nuove tecnologie per far diventare la natura già intimamente politica dell’arte, quando l’arte assolve davvero alla sua funzione, qualche cosa di più intimamente partecipativo. Naturalmente lo spettacolo, in particolare lo spettacolo teatrale, è sempre stato profondamente partecipativo; ma è tuttavia una partecipazione che si è consumata in senso fondamentalmente contemplativistico. C’è un modo di contemplare anche molto partecipato: si esce diversi dallo spettacolo a cui si ha partecipato con molta convinzione, facendo molta elaborazione personale, passionale, emotiva, eccetera. Si può uscire trasformati; ma si esce trasformati come soggetti. Più difficile è dire che quello spettacolo abbia effettivamente trasformato un pezzo di realtà. […] I partecipanti possono effettivamente introdurre qualcosa di determinante dentro l’opera, per esempio modificarla, modificarla a vari livelli, ma possono anche  costruire dei contesti di partecipazione che sono effettivamente “politici” nel senso dell’antica caratterizzazione di questa parola: il luogo dove avvengono le decisioni. Perché la “polis” non è tanto la città nel senso urbanistico moderno ma è lo spazio pubblico in cui si consumano decisioni importanti, in cui davvero la partecipazione cambia le decisioni; e così via.

    Io non finisco di stupirmi di quanto così timidi siano gli artisti… più che timidi, tradizionalisti: cioè legati a qualche cosa come la riproduzione dei vecchi problemi nelle nuove condizioni tecnologiche, piuttosto che fare apparire i nuovi problemi, una cosa che l’arte ha fatto sempre, proprio per sua natura, quella di… anticipare. 

    Pensa che cosa sarebbe possibile se a qualcuno fosse venuto in mente di fare un uso un po’ più spregiudicato dei famosi Google Glass; questo device mi sembrava e mi sembra tuttora di straordinarie opportunità. Ma non solo il device non ha avuto successo nel mercato, ma questo c’era da aspettarselo; soprattutto anche in fase sperimentale è stato utilizzato infinitamente al di sotto delle sue potenzialità. […] Quando è stato utilizzato in modo immediato, soprattutto per lavorare sui rapporti di reciprocità, pensa cosa potrebbe significare, durante uno spettacolo che avesse le sufficienti infrastrutture per accogliere questi interventi, una visione stereoscopica dello spettacolo stesso grazie al fatto che una quarantina, una cinquantina di spettatori potrebbero avere un Google Glass e intervenire, perché Google Glass non è soltanto un recettore ma qualcosa che può produrre dentro l’immagine… insomma, si tratta davvero di, come dire, liberare la fantasia ed essere più spregiudicati.  

    Pensa tu se questi spettatori si trovassero all’interno di una manifestazione politica in senso tradizionale. Uno degli esempi che faccio nel mio libro è quello delle controversissime piazze della Primavera Araba; pensa a che cosa potrebbe essere per noi, per il futuro e per gli usi che se ne sarebbero potuti fare di queste piazze, di ciò che è accaduto in queste piazze, se fossero state percorse da cento manifestanti muniti di un’apparecchiatura di quel genere, cioè di una tecnologia indossabile capace di riprendere e di introdurre riprese. Questo significa che verrebbe di colpo riqualificato il lavoro di ricostruzione del significato politico di alcuni eventi che hanno un carattere, tuttora, sommamente opaco. […] Ho in mente in particolare, un paio d’anni fa con i miei studenti abbiamo fatto un seminario su questo; uno o due film di Piazza Tahrir, quella egiziana, che abbiamo visto, ci erano sembrati particolarmente insoddisfacenti non tanto perché non fossero qualitativamente vivaci, emotivi, importanti, ma perché tu sentivi proprio che avresti avuto bisogno di una maggiore condizione stereoscopica, cioè di vedere di più, di vedere la piazza in modo più capillare e intersecato.

    [Tziga Vertov] è stato quello che ha visto più lontano di tutti. Oggi davvero siamo in grado di dirlo. È stato necessario un cinquantennio per ricominciare a prendere contatto con questo grandissimo pioniere. In una frase bellissima di cui non dimentico mai il tono sconsolato Vertov dice: “Per tutta la vita ho costruito una locomotiva, ma mi sono accorto che mi mancava la rete ferroviaria”. Capisci? La “rete” gli mancava…! È Vertov che ha anticipato. Sì, naturalmente, quello che ci siamo appena detti, sul piano di una struttura che è ancora pensata in senso fondamentalmente lineare, non come un ipertesto ma in modo lineare, Vertov l’aveva anticipata. Per esempio lui pensa a questo suo film del ’24, “Kinoglaz”, “Cine-occhio”, come ad un testo interminabile che può irradiarsi da centri di significato evidenziati dal film stesso, per esempio con le didascalie, nei modi più diversi. Lì ci troviamo di fronte a qualcosa che è interattivo – profondamente, costitutivamente – e anche autopoietico. E lì mancava, effettivamente, la rete, la famosa “rete ferroviaria” che oggi abbiamo.

     

    Pietro Montani, filosofo, ha insegnato Estetica, come professore associato, nella Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell’Università di Urbino dal 1987 al 1992. Nel 1993 è stato chiamato, come professore associato di Estetica, dalla Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell’Università “la Sapienza” di Roma, dove attualmente insegna presso il dipartimento di Studi Filosofici ed Epistemologici. Ha compiuto diversi studi nell’ambito della teoria estetica, con particolare riguardo alle problematiche di carattere linguistico e alle implicazioni dell’uso delle nuove tecnologie in campo comunicativo ed artistico. Nella nostra conversazione siamo partiti dal suo ultimo libro, “Tecnologie della sensibilità – Estetica e immaginazione interattiva”, per discutere del ruolo intimamente “politico” dell’arte in generale e del teatro in particolare; parlando di Google Glass, della Primavera Araba e di Piazza Tahrir, per terminare con Tziga Vertov, il grande regista russo che Pietro apprezza con passione e intensità e che ha più volte trattato in diverse occasioni.

     

       Conversazione con Pietro Montani
    .

       Conversation with Pietro Montani

     

    .
    Tziga Vertov, L’uomo con la macchina da presa
    .
    Il Cairo, Momamed Mahmoud Street (Piazza Tahrir), 20 novembre 2011
    .
    .
    Tziga Vertov, Man With a Movie Camera
    .
    Cairo, Momamed Mahmoud Street (Tahrir Square), November 20, 2011

     

    Where decisions are made: Art and the Polis

    in conversation with Pietro Montani

    Language: Italian

    There’s this great opportunity opened by new technologies: to make the intimately political nature of art – when art really fulfills its task – something more intimately participatory. Obviously performance arts, and theatre in particular, were always participatory, but this participation was always basically a contemplative approach. There is also a kind of participatory contemplation: you are changed by a performance that you watch with great conviction, with a passionate personal, and emotional, elaboration. You can be transformed by that, as a subject. It is more difficult to state that a performance changed a part of reality. […] The participants can indeed give a crucial contribution to a work, even change it, at various levels, as well as build participatory contexts that can be termed “political” in the originary meaning of the word: the place where decisions are taken. Because the “polis” is not so much the city – in the modern, “urban” sense, but the public space where relevant issues are debated, where participation really changes the resulting decisions; and so forth.

    I never cease being amazed at how shy artists are… or rather, traditionalists: I mean tied to things like reproducing old problems in new technological contexts, rather than facing new problems, something art has always done – by its very nature – to… anticipate.

    Imagine what could be possible is somebody thought of some more open-minded use of the famous Google Glass; this device seemed, and still seems to me, an extraordinary opportunity. Alas, the device not only was not commercially successful, which could be expected; but, especially in its experimental phase, it was used way below its potential. […] When used in an immediate way, to work on reciprocal relations, think what it could mean for a performance – if it had the infrastructure to include it – to have a stereoscopic vision of the show itself, thanks to 40 or 50 people in the audience with Google Glass who could intervene, because Google Glass is not only a recipient, but something that can create within the image… in short, it is all about, so to speak, freeing your fantasy and being more open-minded.

    Imagine one of these spectators in a traditional political rally. One of the examples in my book is about those extremely controversial public places during the Arab Spring; think about what it could mean for us, for the future, and could those places have been, what happened on those places, if they were peopled by a hundred demonstrators with that kind of device, a technology capable of shooting and transmitting video. We would abruptly become able to reassess the whole political meaning of some events that have remained, even up to now, largely opaque. […]
    I am thinking in particular – a couple of years ago we did a seminary on it with my students – about one or two videos from Tahrir Square, in Egypt, which had seemed to us especially unsatisfactory, not so much because they were not qualitatively intense, emotional, important, but because you felt precisely that you needed a more stereoscopic situation, to see more, to see the square in a more detailed and intersected way.

    [Tziga Vertov] was the one who saw the furthest. We can say that today. Fifty years were necessary before we reconnect to this great pioneer. In a beautiful phrase – I never forget its desolate tone – Vertov says: “I spent my whole life building a locomotive, but only now do I realise that the rail network is missing”. Do you see? He missed the “network”…! Vertov was ahead of his time. Of course, what we just said about a structure that is still conceived in a basically linear way, not as a hypertext, but in a linear way, that he foresaw. For example, in “Kinoglaz” from 1924, “Movie-eye”, he conceived an endless text that can derive from various meaningful nodes in the movie, for example through subtitles, or in other ways. There we find something interactive – deeply and constitutively – and also autopoietic. And there, indeed, what was missing, was the network, that famous “rail network” that we have today.

     

    Pietro Montani, philosopher, taught Aesthetics, in the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy of the University of Urbino, and in the University “La Sapienza” in Rome, where he actually teaches in the department of Philosophy and Epistemology. He researched various ambits of Aesthetic Theory, in particular the linguistic issues and implications of the use of new technologies in the artistic and communicative fields. In our conversation we started from his latest book “Technologies of Sensitivity – Aesthetics and interactive imagination”, to discuss the eminently “political” role of art in general, and of theatre in particular; discussing Google Glass, the Arab Spring and Tahrir Square, to conclude with Tziga Vertov, the great Russian film director that Pietro admires passionately, and whose work he repeatedly investigated.

     

     

  • 13-06-2015

    Un party, in nessun luogo, da solo a solo

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    conversazione con Marino Formenti

    Lingua: italiano

     

    Io soffro per il fatto che al giorno d’oggi il “sistema” della musica ci obblighi, obblighi i suoi “bambini” (e per “bambini” intendo gli esecutori ma anche gli ascoltatori) a essere costretti in dei corsetti già previsti. Per esempio la iper-professionalizzazione è una cosa che mi dà fastidio. [Per me] come pianista, le possibilità che ho nel mondo della musica, appunto in questo sistema, sono almeno apparentemente abbastanza limitate: mi danno la possibilità di salire in scena, mi danno dai settanta ai cento minuti, ci vuole una pausa in mezzo per soddisfare anche il catering, l’ultimo tram se ne va alle dieci… Da una parte abbiamo una visione dell’arte che è sublime, ancora, al giorno d’oggi, un succedaneo della religione, se vuoi, o dell’esperienza filosofica, alchemica, eccetera; dall’altra però questa religione è praticamente impacchettata in pacchetti che per durata, per aspetto e anche proprio per estetica, per quello che ci si attende dal rapporto tra musica e ascolto, [sono] assolutamente preconfezionati.

    [a proposito di”Nowhere”]… Io allora mi sono immaginato questo spazio dove io… suono. Io mi alzo alla mattina in questo… è una specie di casa di vetro, diciamo, nel mezzo di una città, e io praticamente ho solo un pianoforte, un materasso, un tavolino per mangiare, c’è una specie di carceriere che mi porta due volte al giorno il cibo, e non ho nient’altro: non ho libri non ho iPhone, non ho computer, non ho nient’altro che un pianoforte. Siccome io sono un po’ compulsivo di carattere, praticamente appena mi alzo mi faccio un caffè e mi metto al pianoforte… e l’idea è quella di allargare l’esperienza pianistica sull’intera vita. L’idea però non è di fare una maratona, di andare sul Guinness dei primati, ma è quella di… di diventare musica. La prima volta è stato per una settimana, poi sono diventate due, poi tre, poi quattro e poi alla fine, a Berlino, per le Berliner Festspiele, era un mese.

    Uno degli scopi che ho in questi progetti è quello di “sparire” il più possibile. Credo che ci siano come due vettori nel fare musica: uno è quello di proiettarla, e l’altro è quello di introiettarla. E l’introiezione, più cresco, più invecchio, e più m’interessa. 

    “One to One”, l’idea non era di fare un concerto… setting molto semplice: privato, privatissimo, niente pubblico, niente telecamere, solo io e te. Tu sei uno spettatore o una spettatrice che ha pagato un biglietto, però dal momento i cui tu sei entrato in questo spazio, dove c’è un pianoforte, cioè un salotto e nient’altro, si beve un tè insieme, e piano piano… si parla. Dura due ore, si parla, e io suono, qualche volta hanno suonato anche loro. L’idea quindi non è di un concerto “per” una persona ma veramente un’esperienza, musicale, “con” una persona. Quindi la scelta del repertorio, ma anche l’esecuzione stessa… la mia speranza, il mio scopo, era di suonare per esempio lo stesso pezzo due volte in maniera completamente diversa; […] e rendersi conto che la musica è comunicazione, che è un processo “a due”, e che questo feedback non può che fare bene. 

    [a proposito di “Party”] Questo essere irreggimentati in un sistemino è un rimasuglio, un rimasuglio dell’Ottocento, di una società autoritaria, e di un individuo che era molto meno individualista – nel bene e nel male. Allora ho pensato che sarebbe stato bello creare una situazione molto più aperta. Intanto il tempo è molto più lungo, “Party” dura circa dalle sei alle otto ore; però la buona notizia è che uno può arrivare quando vuole e può andarsene quando vuole. L’idea è che ogni singolo si ritagli il proprio personale “Party”; quindi ci sono diversi programmi, diverse sale… l’idea è lasciare che il singolo decida cosa ascoltare, quanto ascoltare; grande libertà, ma focalizzata ad una maggiore, perché più libera, concentrazione. Ripeto: non lo voglio abolire il concerto [tradizionale]. Però c’è un po’ il pericolo… quando sei seduto lì devi praticamente “obbligarti” a fare un’esperienza estetica; ed è un po’ come obbligarsi ad amare qualcosa o qualcuno, no? Mentre io nel “Party”… magari c’è un pezzo di Morton Feldman, dura quattro ore, e io dopo cinque minuti posso andarmene; e proprio per questo, paradossalmente, rimangono tutti, per quattro ore! Qualcuno si addormenta, qualcuno abbraccia la fidanzata, qualcuno abbraccia la vicina o il vicino, che non era ancora fidanzato… e qui arrivo al secondo, importantissimo aspetto: sì, è fatto per socializzare; perché il concerto è un’esperienza sociale. La musica ce la possiamo ascoltare a casa, via YouTube, eccetera eccetera: se andiamo al concerto, a vedere altre facce, almeno sfruttare questo momento mi sembra una cosa importante.   

    Marino Formenti è uno dei musicisti più curiosi e intelligenti in circolazione: non solo è un eccezionale pianista, lodato come il “Glenn Gould del XXI secolo”, ma anche direttore e performer; ha suonato nei festival più prestigiosi del mondo, presentando sempre progetti e programmi innovativi e raffinati, sorprendenti e appassionanti. Durante la nostra conversazione abbiamo parlato tra l’altro di Nowhere, progetto per il quale Marino vive e suona per giorni o settimane in “una specie di cappella pagana”, uno spazio mobile creato per lui da Kyohei Sakaguchi; di The Party, una performance di sei-otto ore dove il pubblico può arrivare e andarsene a piacere, sedersi, stare in piedi, straiarsi, camminare, chiacchierare, bere, mangiare…; di One to One, esperienza di ascolto e di interazione per un solo spettatore alla volta; di Schubert und ich, dove ha studiato ed eseguito i Lieder di Schubert con cantanti non professionisti, anzi: con non-cantanti. Mentre scrivo, Marino sta eseguendo Nowhere al Kaaitheater di Bruxelles, come sempre in diretta streaming via internet.

       Conversazione con Marino Formenti
    .

       Conversation with Marino Formenti

     

    .
    Nowhere, Graz, Steirischer Herbst 2010
    .
    Frammento dal trailer di Schubert und ich
    .
    .
    Nowhere, Graz, Steirischer Herbst 2010
    .
    A fragment from “Schubert und ich” trailer

     

    A party, nowhere, one to one

    in conversation with Marino Formenti

    Language: Italian

     

    It hurts me that the music “system” nowadays forces its “children” (and by “children” I mean performers but also the audience) into predetermined “corsets”. For example, hyper-professionalisation is something that really annoys me. As a pianist, I have rather limited possibilities in the world of music, in the “system”: I can come on stage, I am given between 70 and 100 minutes, an intermission is required to satisfy the caterer, the last tram leaves at ten… On one hand we have a vision of art that is sublime – even today – some sort of religion if you will, or of philosophic, alchemic experience, etcetera; on the other hand, this religion is practically prepackaged in terms of duration, appearance, and even its aesthetics, and all you can expect from the relation between music and listening, it’s totally prepackaged.

    [concerning “Nowhere”]… I imagined this space where I…play. I get up in the morning in this… it is a sort of glass house, in the middle of a city, and basically I have a piano, a mattress, a dining table, there is this sort of warden who brings me food twice a day, and nothing else: no books, no iPhone, no computer, nothing but a piano. And basically, as I am a slightly compulsive character, as soon as I get up I make coffee and sit at the piano… the idea being to stretch the piano experience to my whole life. The idea is not that of a marathon though, or of breaking a Guinness World Record, but that of… of becoming music. The first time it happened for a week, then it became two weeks, then three, four, and in the end, in Berlin, for the Berliner Festspiele, it lasted a month.

    One of the purposes of this project was to “disappear” as much as possible. I think there are two “vectors” in making music: one is to project it, the other is to introject it. And introjection is what interests me more and more, as I grow older.

    “One to One”, the idea was not to make a concert… a basic setting: private, very private, no audience, no cameras, just you and me. You are a spectator, who paid a ticket, but since you enter this space, where there is a piano, that is a living room, nothing else, we drink tea together, and little by little… we talk. It lasts two hours: we talk, and I play, sometimes even they played. The idea is not that of a concert “for” one person, but a real musical experience, “with” a person. Therefore the choice of the program, and even the playing itself… my hope, my purpose, was for example to play the same piece twice, in a completely different way; […] and realise that music is communication, that it is a mutual process, and this feedback can only do us good.

    This being framed in a system is a legacy of the nineteenth century, of an authoritarian society, and of an individual who was much less… an individualist – for better or for worse. So I thought it would have been great to create a much more open situation. First of all the duration is much longer, “Party” lasts between six and eight hours; the good news is that you can arrive when you want, and leave when you want. The idea is for each person to have his own “Party”; and so there are various programs, various halls… the idea is to leave each person free to choose what to listen to, and for how long; great freedom, but focused for a deeper, being freer, concentration. I repeat: I do not wish to abolish the traditional concert. It’s just that there is a danger there… when you’re sitting there, you practically “force” yourself to an aesthetic experience; and this is like forcing oneself to love something, or someone, isn’t it? While in my “Party”… maybe there is a Morton Feldman piece, lasting four hours, but I can go away after five minutes; and maybe, for this very reason, they all remain there, for four hours! Somebody falls asleep, one hugs his girlfriend, another hugs the one next to him/her, who was not yet his/her partner… and so I get to my second, very important, point: the Party is meant for socialising; because a concert is a social experience. We can listen to music at home, on YouTube, etcetera: if we go to a concert, it seems important to me to take this chance to see other faces.

    Marino Formenti is one of the most curious and intelligent musicians around: not only is he an outstanding pianist, hailed as the “Glenn Gould of the XXI Century”, but also a conductor and performer. He played in the most prestigious festivals, always with innovative, refined, surprising and fascinating programs. During our conversation we discussed “Nowhere”, where Marino lives and plays for days and weeks in “a sort of pagan chapel”, a mobile space, created for him by Kyohei Sakaguchi; and also “The Party”, a six to eight hour performance where the audience can arrive and leave freely, sit, stand, lie down, walk, chat, drink, eat…; and “One to One”, a listening and interaction experience for one spectator at a time; then “Schubert und ich”, where he studied and performed Schubert’s Lieder with non-professional singers, or better: non-singers. While I am writing, Marino is performing “Nowhere” at the Kaaitheater in Brussels, as always streaming live on the internet.

  • 08-06-2015

    (iper)Realismo e Paura

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    L’arte iperrealista mi mette profondamente a disagio. È lo stesso disagio istintivo e viscerale che provo quando mi trovo in prossimità di un’arma da fuoco, o quando mio malgrado sono obbligato a subire musica che cerca in tutti modi di mettermi a mio agio, di anestetizzarmi, per esempio negli ascensori, nei supermercati, in troppi ristoranti.

    Dal punto di vista storico, la funzione e la necessità dell’arte figurativa di ricreare in modo affidabile nello spettatore la sensazione di un oggetto reale sono cambiate,  definitivamente, con l’avvento della fotografia; un’intera sezione dell’arte pittorica, quella del ritratto, ne è stata completamente riformulata. Alcune entusiasmanti esperienze pittoriche di fine ottocento – l’impressionismo, soprattutto Monet e Sisley,  e il divisionismo e il puntillismo di Seurat, Pissarro e Signac – avevano aperto la strada ad una concezione completamente nuova dell’atto stesso del vedere, influenzata in modo decisivo dal processo che stava compiendo la tecnologia fotografica. Il punto di non ritorno, ed anche l’ultimo che per me è ancora interessante, è probabilmente la Pop Art degli anni ruspanti, quando per esempio Roy Lichtenstein imitava la tecnica di pixelaggio tipica della cartellonistica pubblicitaria dipingendo uno ad uno i puntini rossi sui visi dei suoi personaggi per ottenere l’impressione (a distanza) di quel rosa-fumetto che solo quel tipo di stampa poteva dare e alla quale il pubblico della comunicazione commerciale era ormai assuefatto.

    Questione di gusti? Ammetto una mia estrema sensibilità per ciò che non cerca di rappresentare qualcosa di altro da sé ma mi si presenta per quello che è, e mi consente di mettermi in relazione, da uomo a cosa, per così dire. Posso passare delle ore di fronte ad Alchemy di Pollock (ma anche alle ninfee di Monet), avvicinandomi ed allontanandomi dalla tela, lasciandomi avvolgere e coinvolgere dall’energia e dalla passione che scaturisce, fisicamente, dai colori e dall’intrico degli strati di pittura, ancora carichi dell’intensità del gesto dell’autore; e quando guardo le nuvole (penso anche alla scena finale di uno dei più meravigliosi film della storia del cinema, Che cosa sono le nuvole di Pasolini) non cerco né trovo figure già conosciute ma mi lascio incantare dal gioco astratto delle forme, dei movimenti…

    Questione di gusti, forse. Eppure ho la convinzione – intuitiva, ma molto precisa – che l’arte iperrealista abbia a che fare con la paura.

    La paura; l’ossessione del voler ritrovare il già conosciuto; la necessità compulsiva di sentirsi protetti; il rifiuto del dolore come parte integrante dell’esistenza; la disponibilità a cedere parte della propria libertà e della propria dignità in cambio della sensazione di sicurezza. O la manipolazione, che è la paura con il coltello dalla parte del manico: non posso fare a meno di notare che tutti gli assolutismi, di destra e di sinistra, si appoggiano ad una estetica saldamente, stupidamente realista.

    C’è un solo esempio di iperrealismo che mi interessa e intriga: quello in cui proprio questa relazione con la paura viene riconosciuta e messa a nudo, viene fatta centro della comunicazione tra l’oggetto d’arte e lo spettatore. Penso per esempio a certe cose dell’australiano Ron Mueck o anche, in modo diverso, di Maurizio Cattelan; ma soprattutto a Patricia Piccinini, anch’essa australiana, che con le sue spiazzanti, siliconiche repliche di esseri mostruosi e inimmaginati ma in qualche modo familiari arriva al centro di quella paura di cui parlo, causando in chi guarda una profonda, fertile inquietudine che per me é all’opposto del disagio di cui ho parlato prima. Forse in nessun altro artista si è realizzata la descrizione del padre putativo dell’iperrealismo, Jean Baudrillard: la simulazione di qualcosa che non è mai esistito. Ma nel caso della Piccinini quel qualcosa che non è mai esistito è anche uno specchio deformato, lancinante, dell’indicibile nascosto dentro chi guarda.

     

       Patricia Piccinini – The Young Family, 2002

     

    Patricia Piccinini - The Young Family, 2002

     

       Patricia Piccinini – The Young Family, 2002

     

     (hyper)Realism and Fear

    Hyperrealistic art makes me deeply uncomfortable. It is that same instinctive, visceral unease that I feel when I am close to a gun, or when I am forced to put up with music that is meant to “make me feel at ease”, to anaesthetize me, as in elevators, supermarkets, and in many restaurants.

    Historically, the function, and need, of figurative art to recreate the sensation of a real object in a dependable way, have changed permanently with photography; a whole branch of pictorial art, that of portraying, had to be reformulated. Some of the most stimulating art experiences of the late XIX century – Impressionism, especially Monet and Sisley, and Divisionism and Pointillism with Seurat, Pissarro and Signac – had paved the way to a whole new concept of the very act of seeing, crucially influenced by the progress of photographic technology. The point of no return, and the last that I consider of some interest, is Pop Art in its “free-range” years, when Roy Lichtenstein imitated advertising billboards with his “pixel” technique, drawing each red dot on the faces of his characters to give the impression (from a distance) of that very kind of pink that only the comic strips printing technique can give (the so-called “Ben-Day dots”), and that the audience of commercial communication was by then accustomed to.

    Is it only a matter of taste? I concede my extreme sensitivity to that which does not seek to represent something other than itself, and shows itself only as what it is, thus allowing me to relate, “man to thing”, so to speak. I can spend hours in front of Pollock’s Alchemy (or Monet’s Water Lilies), drawing closer then stepping away from the canvas, wrapped up and captivated by the energy and passion that physically spring from the colours and the tangled layers of paint, charged with the intense gestures of the author; and when I look at the clouds (I am also thinking about the ending of one of the greatest movies in cinema history, Pasolini’s What are clouds?) I do not seek to recognise known shapes, rather I am enchanted by the abstract interplay of forms and movements…

    A matter of taste, maybe. But I am convinced – instinctively, but very clearly – that hyperrealist art has to do with fear.

    Fear; an obsessive search for what is already known; the compulsive necessity to feel protected; the refusal of pain as an essential part of our existence; the willingness to give up part of our freedom and dignity in exchange for a feeling of safety. Or manipulation, which is fear “with the whip hand”: I cannot help noticing that all totalitarianisms, be they right or left, support aesthetics that are always deeply, stupidly realistic.

    There is but one example of hyperrealism that interests and intrigues me: that where this relation with fear is recognised and exposed, becoming the centre of the communication between the art object and the viewer. I am thinking about some works by Australian artist Ron Mueck or, in a different way, Maurizio Cattelan; but especially Patricia Piccinini, also an Australian who – with her surprising and shocking silicone replicas of monstrous and unimaginable, though somehow familiar, beings – gets to the heart of the fear I am talking about, causing a deep and fertile disquiet, diametrically opposed to the discomfort I mentioned at the beginning. Maybe no other artist has realised the description of the putative father of hyperrealism, Jean Baudrillard: the imitation of something that never existed. But in the case of Piccinini that which never was is also a piercing and distorted mirror of the unspeakable that lies hidden within the viewer.

  • 29-03-2015

    La sala da concerto come centro di comunicazione

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    Conversazione con Lyndon Terracini

    Lingua: inglese

    In un certo senso, il teatro è sempre stato questo: i teatri sono luoghi dove la gente andava a vedere un’opera, una pièce teatrale, un balletto, ed erano anche luoghi di incontro; e ora, che la società è cambiata e la tecnologia è cambiata in modo incredibile, vuole anche dire che quello che succede in teatro allo stesso tempo può succedere in tutto il mondo! Così un pubblico in qualunque parte del mondo può essere effettivamente parte del pubblico in una città particolare. E penso – quando ne parlavamo a Brisbane ne eravamo entrambi affascinati – che secondo me il futuro… insomma, il futuro è questo. Si sono già visti concerti sinfonici in internet eccetera eccetera, ed è una parte della cosa, ma bisogna discutere in modo molto più ampio, in modo che ci sia una completa connessione da uno spazio performativo in un qualunque punto del mondo verso il resto del mondo; ed è anche questione di una qualche forma di interazione, in modo che le persone che sono parte del pubblico, in tutto il mondo, possano effettivamente partecipare a quello che succede in quel luogo.

    Il periodo è difficile; penso che si possa parlare di una transizione da una situazione in cui i governi nel passato mettevano a disposizione i fondi per mantenere i teatri, le compagnie d’opera, i teatri di prosa, la danza, le orchestre sinfoniche, eccetera; ed ora molti governi si trovano a corto di denaro e per questo cercano di ridurre i loro budget per le arti e gli eventi culturali. Molti di loro sperano che i privati e il mondo aziendale rimpiazzino i fondi pubblici. Ma al momento ci troviamo in realtà in mezzo a quel periodo: non ci sono abbastanza risorse dai privati e dalle aziende, eppure i fondi pubblici vengono ridotti, in tutto il mondo. Dobbiamo affrontare questo periodo; e la mia sensazione è che ci sia bisogno di più creatività e di idee migliori su come comunicare con il pubblico; un pubblico contemporaneo, un pubblico abituato alle nuove tecnologie.

    Con la “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour” è stato interessante, perché la prima volta che ho visitato il luogo, immediatamente mi ha suggerito che, in effetti, si tratta della cultura di Sydney; stando seduti là si può vedere il Sydney Harbour Bridge, la Sydney Opera House e la skyline della città, e tutto questo dice, semplicemente: questa è Sydney. L’altra cosa molto importante è che – hai citato la produzione di Butterfly con la regia de La Fura dels Baus, di Alex Ollé – è più facile per noi mettere in scena una produzione un po’ più coraggiosa e più contemporanea se lo facciamo in quel tipo di spazio piuttosto che in teatro, perché il pubblico che viene non è il pubblico tradizionale dell’opera lirica, non ha gli stessi pregiudizi. Così stiamo trovando un nuovo pubblico, e come hai detto si tratta di portare quel pubblico verso altre cose.

    Questo è il sogno: che si arrivi ad un punto dove il pubblico venga a vedere cose che riflettano davvero la cultura contemporanea, che parlino delle loro vite, di quello che succede ora, con i compositori che finiscono i pezzi… la settimana scorsa!

    Insomma, è assurdo che non creiamo nuove opere che riescano ad entrare nel repertorio. E il problema non è che non ci sono pezzi meravigliosi, ci sono alcuni pezzi fantastici. Ma se cerchiamo di presentarli ad un pubblico – devo dirlo – conservatore in un contesto nel quale presentiamo l’opera del XIX secolo, non funziona. Però se troviamo un contesto differente, in modo che abbiano un modo diverso di osservare, di ascoltare, allora credo che le cose cambieranno.

    È imporante. È importante farlo, e basta. Ma io credo – è il caso di molti dei tuoi lavori, con un contesto sociale molto serio – che se noi troviamo lo spazio giusto, a Sydney o in qualunque altra città del mondo, se quello che facciamo riflette la cultura di quel particolare luogo, se ha rilevanza sociale rispetto a quel particolare luogo, allora la connessione con il pubblico è molto più… è più ampia, ma è anche più focalizzata, perché stai lavorando su coloro ai quali presenterai il progetto, in una società contemporanea.

    Lyndon Terracini è il direttore artistico di Opera Australia, la compagnia d’opera nazionale australiana. Dopo una prestigiosa carriera di cantante, particolarmente intensa nel campo della musica contemporanea, è stato direttore artistico del Queensland Music Festival a Brisbane (dove ha realizzato un festival esclusivamente con musica dell XX secolo) e del Brisbane Festival. La nostra collaborazione è iniziata nel 2003, quando mi ha invitato a dirigere “Surrogate Cities” di Heiner Goebbels al QPAC di Brisbane; poi ha invitato in Australia il mio “CREDO” e commissionato e messo in scena “WINNERS”, la cui prima mondiale ha avuto luogo nell’ambito del Brisbane Festival, prima della ripresa a Parigi al Centre Pompidou. Nel 2011 mi ha chiamato a debuttare come direttore d’orchestra alla Sydney Opera House; i progetti più prestigiosi che da allora abbiamo realizzato insieme in campo operistico sono la prima mondiale della regia de La Fura dels Baus di “Un Ballo in Maschera” di Verdi e, recentemente, una festa pucciniana con la “Tosca” con la regia di John Bell a Melbourne e il Gala di Capodanno de ” LaBohème” alla Sydney Opera House, con la regia di Gale Edwards. Durante la nostra conversazione abbiamo parlato tra l’altro anche di “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour” la serie annuale di produzioni sul palco galleggiante sulla baia di Sydney; dopo “Traviata”, “Carmen” e la “Madama Butterfly” de La Fura dels Baus, proprio pochi giorni fa ha debuttato con grande successo la sontuosa “Aida” di Gale Edwards.

       Conversazione con Lyndon Terracini (video: Giulio Tami)
    .

       Conversation with Lyndon Terracini (video: Giulio Tami)

     

    .
    Un frammento del video documentario di WINNERS – Brisbane Festival 2006
    .
    Madama Butterfly con la regia de La Fura dels Baus sulla baia di Sydney
    .
    .
    Extract from the video documentary of
    WINNERS – Brisbane Festival 2006
    .
    Madame Butterfly directed by La Fura dels Baus on the Sydney Harbour

     

    The performance venue as a communication centre

    in conversation with Lyndon Terracini

    Language: English

    In a way, theatre has always been that. Theatres are places where people went to see an opera, or a play, or a dance piece, and it was a gathering point too; and now that society has changed and technology has changed incredibly, it can also mean that what happens in that theatre at the same time can happen globally! So an audience all over the world can actually be part of that audience that is in a specific city. And I think – when we were talking about it in Brisbane we were both fascinated by it – it seems to me that the future… well, it’s about that, I mean. There have been things with symphony orchestra concerts online and so on and so on, which is part of that, but there is a much broader discussion to have, so that there is a complete connection from one performing arts space anywhere in the world to the rest of the world; and also, too, it’s about some sort of interaction, so that those people who are part of that audience, globally, can actually participate in what you are doing in that centre.

    There is this difficult period; I guess we can refer to it as a transition from where governments in the past were providing funds to maintain theatres, opera company, prosa theatres, dance, symphony orchestras and so on, and now a lot of governments are finding that they are short of money and so they look to reduce the budget they have for arts and cultural events. A lot of them are hoping that philantropists and the corporate sector will replace the government fundings. But at the moment we are actually between that period: there is not enough money from corporate sponsors and philantropists, and yet the government money is being reduced, all over the world. We have to get through that period; and my feeling too is that that requires more thought and better ideas about how we communicate with the public; a contemporary public, a public that is used to new technologies.

    With Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour it has been very interesting, because when I first looked at that site, it immediately said to me that this is actually about the culture of Sydney; and sitting there you look at the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Sydney Opera House and the skyline, and everything about it just says, this is in Sydney. And that was an important part of it. The other really important thing is – you mentioned the production of Butterfly that La Fura dels Baus, Alex Ollé, directed – it is easier for us to do a production that is a bit more edgy and contemporary when we do it on that stage than it is in the theatre, because the audience that’s coming is not a traditional opera audience, so they don’t have the same prejudices. So we are finding this new audience and as you said it’s about how you translate that audience into other things.

    That’s the dream: that we can take it to a place where the audience would come and see something that’s really about contemporary culture, that’s about their lives, that is happening now, with composers who finish the piece… last week!

    I mean, it’s crazy that we are not making new pieces that are going into the repertoire. And it’s not that there aren’t wonderful pieces, there are some fantastic pieces. But if we try to present to a – frankly – conservative opera-going public a new piece in a context where we would present nineteenth century opera, then it does not translate to it. But if we find a different context, so that they have a different way to looking at it, a different way of hearing it, then I think that will change.

    It’s important. It’s important to do it, full stop. But I think – it’s the case of a lot of your work, it has a very serious social context – and I think for us to find the right space, in Sydney or any city in the world, if that reflects the culture of that particular place, if it has a social relevance to that particular place, then the connection with the audience is a lot more… it’s broader, but it’s also more focused, because you’re working out who you are going to play to, in a contemporary society.

    Lyndon Terracini is the Artistic Director of Opera Australia, Australia’s national opera company. After a highly successful career as a singer, particularly in contemporary music, he was appointed Artistic Director of the Queensland Music Festival in Brisbane (where he programmed a Festival of exclusively XX century music) and then of the Brisbane Festival. Our collaboration started in 2003, when he invited me to conduct Heiner Goebbels’ “Surrogate Cities” at the QPAC in Brisbane; he later brought my “CREDO” to Australia and commissioned and produced “WINNERS”, premièred at the Brisbane Festival, before being performed at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. In 2011 he asked me to debut as conductor at the Sydney Opera House; the most prestigious projects we realised were the première of Verdi’s “Un Ballo in Maschera” directed by La Fura dels Baus and, recently, a Puccini celebration with “Tosca” directed by John Bell in Melbourne and a New Year’s Eve Gala with “La Bohème” at the Sydney Opera House, directed by Gale Edwards. During our conversation we spoke among other things about “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour”, the yearly production on the floating stage on the Sydney Harbour. After “Traviata”, “Carmen” and “Madame Butterfly” by La Fura dels Baus, just a couple of days ago the sumptuous “Aida” directed by Gale Edwards had its hugely successful opening night.

  • 17-03-2015

    Voci e grida, respiri e sospiri - per una vocalità della natura umana

    Bandiera EN

    English version

     

    Conversazione con Stefano Luigi Mangia

    Lingua: italiano

    Io penso che per anni la vocalità sia stata un po’ ingabbiata, ingabbiata in archetipi stilistici, che conosciamo bene, mentre negli ultimi anni, intendo dire quasi un secolo, si è iniziata a liberare. In realtà, io penso che sia un vero e proprio recupero, un recupero degli elementi vocalici primordiali; quindi un discorso quasi filogenetico che si intreccia con uno ontogenetico.

    Alcuni suoni vocalici fanno parte della natura umana, come diceva la Berberian ne "La nuova vocalità"; e le espressioni del volto, il sorriso, sono tutti elementi micro-mimici che possono diventare oggetto di sperimentazione; e quindi vanno recuperati. Per un bambino è nomale fare [emette dei vocalismi che ricordano la voce infantile] perché per lui è un modo per sperimentare l’ambiente acustico che ha attorno; magari metterlo in una composizione diventa interessante perché può essere approfondito; diversamente rimane solo un effetto vocale. E [che] la distinzione tra un effetto vocale e un’esigenza comunicativa, come il bambino che piange, che urla, che grida, possa diventare invece oggetto di studio, si possa mettere una lente sopra questi suoni, sopra il pianto, è interessante. Come ha fatto Berio con "A-Ronne", nella quale composizione ci sono suoni, urla, diventano importanti per questo, sospiri [emette dei suoni sussurrati]…

    Io penso che la vocalità abbia dei suoni veramente infiniti; alcuni sono collegati con le caratteristiche fisioanatomiche dell’individuo, quindi sono specifiche di quel cantante, di quella persona, e sono importanti proprio perché rappresentano un unicum.

    Con l’introduzione della tecnologia, in quel caso dei primi microfoni, questo ha permesso di lavorare, di sperimentare attraverso il mezzo; per cui piccoli suoni come questi [emette una sequenza di veloci e delicatissimi suoni vocali] non potevano essere oggetto artistico. Mi viene in mente una dichiarazione di Carmelo Bene che faceva proprio questa riflessione, che il microfono era importantissimo perché era un oggetto d’arte oltre che un oggetto culturale. Tra l’altro è anche difficile usarlo, usarlo bene; ecco perché alcuni cantanti lirici hanno difficoltà, sono spaventati, perché non sono abituati ad utilizzare tutte le sfumature. È come un pennello; bisogna saperlo usare. [si allontana dal microfono] Se io parlo qua devo ovviamente aumentare la voce; [si avvicina a pochissima distanza dal microfono] se parlo qui devo ovviamente lavorare su altre sfumature vocali [parla a voce appena sussurrata] che potrebbero essere anche piccolissime, così.

    Mi piace molto l’idea di sperimentare il respiro, il respiro vocale; metterlo però in poliritmia, in polifonia. Mi sono accorto, da un periodo di studio, che il respiro ha tantissimi colori che però bisogna approfondire. Può essere un respiro [accompagna la descrizione con esempi vocali] più affannato, oppure può essere un respiro più lento; può essere un respiro con la bocca, con il naso; questo cambia anche il suono. Però bisogna mettrci la lente sopra…

    Stefano Luigi Mangia è un giovane vocalista, improvvisatore e compositore pugliese i cui interessi spaziano dal jazz, alla musica contemporanea, alle improvvisazioni radicali. Tra le sue attività più recenti la partecipazione all’opera Katër i Radës. Il naufragio del compositore albanese Admir Skhurtaj alle Corderie dell’Arsenale di Venezia per la Biennale 2014, il lavoro di sperimentazione e ricerca con il LAByrinthus Choir, da lui fondato, e due progetti da poco usciti in CD: cagExperience, dedicato a John Cage, e Glad To Be Unhappy.

    Stefano e alcuni membri del LAByrinthus Choir hanno partecipato al "We Are Here Chorus", il coro "virtuale" protagonista dell’ultima scena di "- qui non c’è perchè -", inviando una serie di video con frammenti e improvvisazioni vocali nel corso di un’interazione a distanza durata diversi mesi.

    Conversazione con Stefano Luigi Mangia
    .

    Conversation with Stefano Luigi Mangia
    .

    "Aria" da Katër i Radës. Il naufragio di Admir Skhurtaj, Venezia, Biennale 2014
    .
    .
    "Air" from Katër i Radës. The Shipwreck by Admir Skhurtaj, Venice, Biennale 2014
    .

     

    Voices and screams, breaths and sighs – for a vocality of human nature

    In conversation with Stefano Luigi Mangia

    Language: Italian

    I think that vocality has been boxed in for years in a cage of stylistic archetypes that we know very well, while in the more recent years, and by that I mean almost a century, it has begun to free itself. I actually view it as recovering primordial vocal elements; almost as in a phylogenetic process crossed with an ontogenetic one.

    Some vocal sounds are part of human nature, as Berberian said in “The new vocality”; and face expressions, our smile, are all micro-gestures that can be experimented upon, and need to be recovered. It is normal for a child to go like [makes childlike vocal sounds] because that is his/her way of exploring the acoustic environment; it can even become interesting to use it in a composition, if we delve deeper; otherwise it remains merely a vocal effect. The distinction between a vocal effect and an expressive necessity, as when a child is crying and screaming, can become the object of our study, as if under a magnifying lens. This is what Berio did in A-Ronne, where you can find sounds and screams, whispers [makes whispering sounds]…

    I think human vocality can have an infinite array of sounds; some are tied to the physio-anatomical features of an individual, and therefore belong to one specific singer, as a person, and these are important especially because they represent an unicum.

    The introduction of technology – in that case, the first microphones – allowed work and experimentation with the new medium; because earlier on tiny sounds such as these [makes a sequence of fast and delicate vocal sounds] could not be the object of art. Let me quote from Carmelo Bene who dealt precisely with this issue, that the microphone was of the utmost importance, because it was an object of art, besides being a cultural object. It is a difficult instrument, one has to know how to use it well; this is why some opera singers have trouble using it, they are afraid of it, because they are not used to all the nuances that it allows. It is like a brush: one has to know how to use it. [getting farther from the microphone] If I talk from here, I obviously have to raise my voice; [getting closer] if I talk from here of course I have to work on different vocal nuances [in a whispering voice] that could get tinier and tinier, like this.

    I like the idea of experimenting with breath very much, vocal breath; but inserting it in a polyrhythm, a polyphony. I realised, after a period of study, that breathing can have many different colours that I need to get deeper into. The breath can be panting [makes vocal examples], or a slower breath; it can be with the mouth, with the nose; this changes its sound. But you need to have a lens on it…

    Stefano Luigi Mangia, is a young vocalist, improviser and composer from Apulia, whose interests span from jazz to contemporary music, to radical improvisation. Among his recent projects, the opera Katër i Radës. The Shipwreck by Albanian composer Admir Skhurtaj at the Corderie dell’Arsenale in Venice for the Biennale 2014, the experimental research work with the LAByrinthus Choir, that he founded, and two recently published CDs: cagExperience, dedicated to John Cage, and Glad To Be Unhappy.

    Stefano and other members of the LAByrinthus Choir participated to the “We Are Here Chorus”, the virtual choir appearing in the last scene of “- there is no why here -“, sending a series of videos with fragments and vocal improvisations during a “remote” interaction lasting several months.

  • 01-03-2015

    Calvin, Hobbes, la CNN in Iraq e Robin Williams fuori fuoco

    Bandiera EN

    English version

     

    Straordinario, come sempre. Calvin, il terribile e meraviglioso bambino di sei anni con il tigrotto Hobbes, il suo compagno di avventure, che appare come un pupazzo di pezza agli occhi dei genitori, sono senza ombra di dubbio la striscia migliore dell’ultima generazione; in nulla inferiore ai grandiosi Peanuts. Ma in questo caso è il padre di Calvin, normalmente vittima designata dei virtuosismi immaginativi del figlio, ad uscirsene con una sequenza fulminante:

    Calvin: – Papà, come è possibile che le vecchie fotografie siano sempre in bianco e nero? Non avevano pellicole a colori a quel tempo?
    Padre: – Certo che ce l’avevano. In realtà, quelle vecchie fotografie sono a colori. Era il mondo che allora era in bianco e nero.
    – Davvero?
    – Certo. Il mondo non è diventato a colori fino a verso gli anni ’30, e per un po’ era anche di un colore piuttosto sgranato…
    – È davvero strano.
    – Be’, la realtà è più strana della finzione.
    – Ma perché i vecchi dipinti sono a colori? Se il mondo fosse stato in bianco e nero, gli artisti non l’avrebbero dipinto in quel modo?
    – Non necessariamente. Molti grandi artisti erano pazzi.
    Ma… ma insomma, come avrebbero potuto dipingere a colori? Le loro pitture allora non sarebbero dovute essere in toni di grigio?
    Certo, ma sono diventate a colori come tutto il resto negli anni ’30.
    Ma allora perché anche le vecchie fotografie non sono diventate a colori?
    – Perché erano immagini a colori di un mondo in bianco e nero, ricordi?
    Calvin (a Hobbes): Il mondo è un posto complicato, Hobbes.
    Hobbes: Tutte le volte che mi sembra così, mi faccio un sonnellino su un albero e aspetto la cena.

    Insomma: le caratteristiche tecniche di un oggetto di comunicazione ne influenzano direttamente il linguaggio; ancora meglio, ne fanno parte. Nel caso di un flusso audiovisivo, la grana e la risoluzione dell’immagine, la qualità dell’audio, il tipo e la gradazione del colore, e anche, ad un altro livello, le caratteristiche tecniche dell’apparecchio utilizzato per la riproduzione (dimensioni dello schermo, disposizione e qualità degli altoparlanti, perfino le caratteristiche dell’ambiente nel quale si trova lo spettatore) diventano parte integrante del contenuto.

    Oggi vedere un film in bianco e nero comporta una sorta di sospensione dell’incredulità di carattere storico o estetico. Però gli spettatori dei primi decenni della storia del cinema non si ponevano neppure il problema: molto semplicemente, non c’erano alternative, e l’impatto comunicativo della nuova tecnologia era talmente efficace da rendere percettivamente irrilevante quello straniamento (una leggenda vuole che alle prime proiezioni dei Fratelli Lumière gli spettatori abbandonassero precipitosamente la sala, temendo di venire investiti dal treno che si avvicinava sullo schermo). Con l’avvento del colore il bianco e nero è poi diventato sempre più una sorta di distacco linguistico, tutto sommato non diverso dall’uso che Stravinskij faceva del latino nella Sinfonia dei Salmi, servendosene per creare un distacco emotivo, una sorta di volontaria attenuazione neoclassica dell’intensità della narrazione testuale.

    D’altra parte, nel momento in cui una certa caratteristica non è più implicita nella condizione tecnica, può diventare cifra stilistica e linguistica. L’esempio più straordinario in questo senso è probabilmente „Zelig“ di Woody Allen. La narrazione in forma di un finto documentario, con finti frammenti d’archivio, è realizzata splendidamente, e la grana cinematografica volutamente diversa è capace di restituire con incredibile virtuosismo l’illusione di una diversa provenienza storica delle diverse sequenze. Un altro esempio ormai classico è l’inserimento di un elemento filmicamente incoerente per sottolineare l’emotività del momento narrativo; penso per esempio ai pesci combattenti di „Rumble Fish“ di Coppola o al vestito rosa della bimba in „Schindler’s List“ di Spielberg, unici barlumi di colore in due film altrimenti girati in un raffinatissimo bianco e nero, o alla fulminante apparizione di un Robin Williams fuori fuoco in „Deconstructing Harry“, di nuovo di Woody Allen („Daddy’s out of focus, daddy’s out of focus…“). Esempi come „Zelig“ e „Deconstructing Harry“ mi sembrano straordinari nello sfruttare narrativamente in modo incredibilmente efficace – e divertente – le caratteristiche linguistiche specifiche del mezzo di comunicazione utilizzato, in questo caso il cinema.

    Trovo interessante anche il fatto che mentre è tecnicamente e stilisticamente possibile ricreare o imitare le condizioni tecniche del passato (per esempio, appunto, decidendo di girare un film in bianco e nero o servendosi di quei comunissimi „plug-in“ digitali che imitano i difetti di una pellicola analogica o la distorsione vocale data da un apparecchio telefonico) non è invece efficace il procedimento contrario. Qualche tempo fa c’è stato il tentativo, di breve durata, di colorare artificialmente i vecchi film, nella convinzione che il bianco e nero, ormai fuori moda, scoraggiasse gli spettatori a vedere i film di repertorio. Il risultato è stato di precipitare quei film in una „terra di nessuno“ estetica: i colori aggiunti artificialmente contraddicevano la luce e la fotografia originale, che naturalmente era stata concepita per il bianco e nero, e crevano un effetto di straniamento stilistico che distruggeva completamente l’efficacia di quelle pellicole, indipendentemente dal contenuto: l’effetto si verificava con la stessa intensità sia nei film con Humphrey Bogart che in quelli con Stanlio e Ollio. Osservando la cosa da un’altra angolatura, dalle caratteristiche tecniche di un audiovisivo è possibile dedurre immediatamente e irrevocabilmente che non può essere stato realizzato prima di un certo periodo storico.

    Ma di recente si è compiuto un passo ulteriore, che trovo intrigante e significativo: tecniche e qualità audiovisive anche molto differenti tra loro coesistono nella nostra esperienza comunicativa quotidiana in funzione del contesto di utilizzo. Quando durante la prima guerra in Iraq gli inviati della CNN e di FoxNews inviavano immagini dai primi videotelefoni satellitari la qualità era bassissima, con una risoluzione e una stabilità del’immagine nemmeno lontanamente paragonabile non solo con lo standard cinematografico ma anche con la qualità a cui era abituato un normale spettatore televisivo; e persino con la qualità delle altre immagini con le quali veniva documentato lo stesso evento nello stesso programma televisivo. Eppure quelle immagini sono entrate nella nostra memoria collettiva non solo per il loro contenuto ma anche proprio per le loro caratteristiche tecniche; le condizioni nelle quali sono state realizzate erano tali da rendere impossibile una qualità migliore, e il pubblico ha accettato questa caratteristica come parte integrante del linguaggio audiovisivo di quella particolare situazione. Quando conversiamo con i nostri conoscenti via Skype diamo per scontata una qualità audiovisiva che rifiuteremmo se fossimo al cinema; eppure entrambe queste esperienze percettive fanno parte del nostro vissuto quotidiano e coesistono in funzione del contesto in cui ci troviamo. Basta una rapida occhiata ai siti di social network per osservare un’enorme varietà di qualità tecnologica nei materiali audiovisivi. Non solo questa varietà non contraddice la funzione comunicativa delle piattaforme, ma ne è diventata un elemento caratterizzante; e proprio le caratteristiche tecniche del singolo contributo ci permettono di inserirlo nel suo appropriato contesto comunicativo.

    Questa varietà non solo non comporta contraddizioni o confusione, ma è un elemento stilisticamente rilevante di questa modalità comunicativa ed espressiva. Le caratteristiche tecniche dell’audiovisivo non sono più un accessorio ma diventano parte integrante del contenuto; per usare un concetto che mi è caro, il contesto è parte del testo. Sono convinto che in questo ambito le possibilità di sviluppo siano enormi.

      Bill Watterson: Calvin&Hobbes
    .Calvin & Hobbes
       Bill Watterson: Calvin&Hobbes
    Robin Williams in Deconstructing Harry di Woody Allen
    Reportage in diretta della CNN all’inizio della guerra in Iraq (2003)
    Harry-play CNN
    Robin Williams in Woody Allen’s Deconstructing Harry
    CNN live coverage of the beginning of the Iraq War (2003)

     

    Calvin, Hobbes, CNN in Iraq and Robin Williams out of focus

    Extraordinary as always. Calvin, the terrible and marvellous six-year old kid, with his comrade-in-arms, the tiger Hobbes (who appears as a dummy to Calvin’s parents) are the best comic strip of the last generation, on a par with the fantastic Peanuts. In this strip, Calvin’s father, usually the chosen victim of his son’s imaginative virtuosity, strikes back with a fulminating sequence:

    Calvin: – Dad, how come old photographs are always black and white? Didn’t they have color film back then?
    Father: – Sure they did, in fact, those old photographs are in color. It’s just the world was black and white then.
    – Really?
    – Yep. The world didn’t turn color until sometime in the 1930s, and it was pretty grainy color for a while, too.
    – That’s really weird.
    – Well, truth is stranger than fiction.
    – But then why are old paintings in color?! If the world was black and white, wouldn’t artists have painted it that way?
    – Not necessarily. A lot of great artist were insane.
    – But…but how could they have painted in color anyway? Wouldn’t their paints have been shades of gray back then?
    – Of course, but they turned colors like everything else did in the ’30s.
    – So why didn’t old black and white photos turn color too?
    – Because they were color pictures of black and white, remember?
    Calvin (to Hobbes): The world is a complicated place, Hobbes.
    Hobbes: Whenever it seems that way, I take a nap in a tree and wait for dinner.

    So: the technical features of a communication object influence its language; better still, they are part of it. In the case of an audiovisual stream, the grain and the resolution, the audio quality, the type and grade of colour and, on another level, the technical features of the device used to reproduce the stream (screen size, placement and quality of the speakers, even the location where the viewer is) are an essential part of the content.

    Today, watching a black and white movie implies a kind of suspension of disbelief, historically and aesthetically. To the audiences from the first decades of cinema this was not a problem: there were simply no alternatives, and the communicative effect of the new technology was so strong that the perceptive estrangement became irrelevant (as the legend has it, at one of the first projection by the Lumière Brothers, people would walk out of the hall, in fear of the approaching train on the screen). With the transition to colour, black and white became a sort of linguistic distinction, not far from the way Stravinsky used Latin in his Symphony of Psalms, so as to obtain an emotional detachment, a sort of neoclassical mitigation of the intensity of the textual narration.

    When a certain characteristic is not derived from the technical limitations of the means, it can become a stylistic and linguistic feature. One of the most extraordinary examples of this is “Zelig” by Woody Allen. Its narration, as a fake documentary with fake archival footage, is splendidly realised, and the film grain, intentionally differentiated, can render the illusion of different historical sources with amazing virtuosity. Another example, now a classic, is the insertion of a filmically incoherent element to underline the emotionality of a certain narrative moment. Take for example the Siamese Fighting Fish in Coppola’s “Rumble Fish”, or the little girl’s pink dress in Spielberg’s “Schindler’s List”, the sole touches of colour in those two extremely refined black and white movies, or the striking appearance of an out of focus Robin Williams in Woody Allen’s “Deconstructing Harry” (“Daddy’s out of focus, daddy’s out of focus…“). These examples are extraordinary in the extremely effective and funny way they narratively exploit the specific linguistic characteristics of their communicative means, cinema.

    Another interesting fact is that while it is technically and stylistically possible to recreate or imitate the technical conditions of the past (by shooting in black and white, or using digital plug-ins to imitate the grain of analog film or the distorted voice of old phones), the opposite is not possible. Some time ago there were short-lived attempts to artificially colour old movies, in the conviction that audiences were discouraged from watching old repertoire movies because of the outmoded black and white. The result was turning those movies into an aesthetical “no man’s land”: the artificially added colours conflicted with the original lighting and photography, conceived for black and white, creating a stylistic estrangement that completely destroyed the effectiveness of those films, irrespective of their contents: this effect was the same with Humphrey Bogart or Laurel & Hardy films. To put it another way: from the technical features of an audiovisual object, we can immediately and irrevocably gather that it cannot have been realised before a certain date.

    Recently a further step was taken, an intriguing and meaningful one: very different audiovisual techniques and qualities coexist in our daily experience, depending on the context they are used in. During the first Iraq War, the reporters of CNN and FoxNews were sending images from early satellite videophones: of extremely low quality, the resolution and stability of images were not only much worse than movie standards, but also worse than the average quality TV viewers were accustomed to; and even worse than other images used to document the same event in the same TV program. And yet those images entered our collective memory, not only for their contents, but for their very technical characteristics. The conditions in which they were taken made it impossible to have a better quality, and the audience accepted this as an integral part of the audiovisual language for that situation. When we video-chat with our friends on Skype, we take for granted an audio-video quality that we would reject if we were at the movies; and yet both these perceptive experiences are part of our everyday life, and they coexist, depending on the context. A quick look at social network sites shows us a huge diversity in the technological quality of audiovisual materials. This diversity not only does not contradict the communicative function of those platforms, but it has become their distinctive feature; and the specific technical characteristics of single contribution allow us to place it in the appropriate communicative context.

    This diversity does not merely imply contradiction or confusion, rather it becomes a stylistically relevant element of this kind of expressivity and communication. The technical characteristics are not accessory anymore, they become an essential part of the content; to recall a concept that I deem essential, the context is part of the text. I am convinced that there are great possibilities for developments in this field.

ottobre: 2018
L M M G V S D
« Mar    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Logo coproduttori

© RAI 2013 - tutti i diritti riservati. P.Iva 06382641006 Engineered by RaiNet