Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
  • 29-03-2015

    La sala da concerto come centro di comunicazione

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    Conversazione con Lyndon Terracini

    Lingua: inglese

    In un certo senso, il teatro è sempre stato questo: i teatri sono luoghi dove la gente andava a vedere un’opera, una pièce teatrale, un balletto, ed erano anche luoghi di incontro; e ora, che la società è cambiata e la tecnologia è cambiata in modo incredibile, vuole anche dire che quello che succede in teatro allo stesso tempo può succedere in tutto il mondo! Così un pubblico in qualunque parte del mondo può essere effettivamente parte del pubblico in una città particolare. E penso – quando ne parlavamo a Brisbane ne eravamo entrambi affascinati – che secondo me il futuro… insomma, il futuro è questo. Si sono già visti concerti sinfonici in internet eccetera eccetera, ed è una parte della cosa, ma bisogna discutere in modo molto più ampio, in modo che ci sia una completa connessione da uno spazio performativo in un qualunque punto del mondo verso il resto del mondo; ed è anche questione di una qualche forma di interazione, in modo che le persone che sono parte del pubblico, in tutto il mondo, possano effettivamente partecipare a quello che succede in quel luogo.

    Il periodo è difficile; penso che si possa parlare di una transizione da una situazione in cui i governi nel passato mettevano a disposizione i fondi per mantenere i teatri, le compagnie d’opera, i teatri di prosa, la danza, le orchestre sinfoniche, eccetera; ed ora molti governi si trovano a corto di denaro e per questo cercano di ridurre i loro budget per le arti e gli eventi culturali. Molti di loro sperano che i privati e il mondo aziendale rimpiazzino i fondi pubblici. Ma al momento ci troviamo in realtà in mezzo a quel periodo: non ci sono abbastanza risorse dai privati e dalle aziende, eppure i fondi pubblici vengono ridotti, in tutto il mondo. Dobbiamo affrontare questo periodo; e la mia sensazione è che ci sia bisogno di più creatività e di idee migliori su come comunicare con il pubblico; un pubblico contemporaneo, un pubblico abituato alle nuove tecnologie.

    Con la “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour” è stato interessante, perché la prima volta che ho visitato il luogo, immediatamente mi ha suggerito che, in effetti, si tratta della cultura di Sydney; stando seduti là si può vedere il Sydney Harbour Bridge, la Sydney Opera House e la skyline della città, e tutto questo dice, semplicemente: questa è Sydney. L’altra cosa molto importante è che – hai citato la produzione di Butterfly con la regia de La Fura dels Baus, di Alex Ollé – è più facile per noi mettere in scena una produzione un po’ più coraggiosa e più contemporanea se lo facciamo in quel tipo di spazio piuttosto che in teatro, perché il pubblico che viene non è il pubblico tradizionale dell’opera lirica, non ha gli stessi pregiudizi. Così stiamo trovando un nuovo pubblico, e come hai detto si tratta di portare quel pubblico verso altre cose.

    Questo è il sogno: che si arrivi ad un punto dove il pubblico venga a vedere cose che riflettano davvero la cultura contemporanea, che parlino delle loro vite, di quello che succede ora, con i compositori che finiscono i pezzi… la settimana scorsa!

    Insomma, è assurdo che non creiamo nuove opere che riescano ad entrare nel repertorio. E il problema non è che non ci sono pezzi meravigliosi, ci sono alcuni pezzi fantastici. Ma se cerchiamo di presentarli ad un pubblico – devo dirlo – conservatore in un contesto nel quale presentiamo l’opera del XIX secolo, non funziona. Però se troviamo un contesto differente, in modo che abbiano un modo diverso di osservare, di ascoltare, allora credo che le cose cambieranno.

    È imporante. È importante farlo, e basta. Ma io credo – è il caso di molti dei tuoi lavori, con un contesto sociale molto serio – che se noi troviamo lo spazio giusto, a Sydney o in qualunque altra città del mondo, se quello che facciamo riflette la cultura di quel particolare luogo, se ha rilevanza sociale rispetto a quel particolare luogo, allora la connessione con il pubblico è molto più… è più ampia, ma è anche più focalizzata, perché stai lavorando su coloro ai quali presenterai il progetto, in una società contemporanea.

    Lyndon Terracini è il direttore artistico di Opera Australia, la compagnia d’opera nazionale australiana. Dopo una prestigiosa carriera di cantante, particolarmente intensa nel campo della musica contemporanea, è stato direttore artistico del Queensland Music Festival a Brisbane (dove ha realizzato un festival esclusivamente con musica dell XX secolo) e del Brisbane Festival. La nostra collaborazione è iniziata nel 2003, quando mi ha invitato a dirigere “Surrogate Cities” di Heiner Goebbels al QPAC di Brisbane; poi ha invitato in Australia il mio “CREDO” e commissionato e messo in scena “WINNERS”, la cui prima mondiale ha avuto luogo nell’ambito del Brisbane Festival, prima della ripresa a Parigi al Centre Pompidou. Nel 2011 mi ha chiamato a debuttare come direttore d’orchestra alla Sydney Opera House; i progetti più prestigiosi che da allora abbiamo realizzato insieme in campo operistico sono la prima mondiale della regia de La Fura dels Baus di “Un Ballo in Maschera” di Verdi e, recentemente, una festa pucciniana con la “Tosca” con la regia di John Bell a Melbourne e il Gala di Capodanno de ” LaBohème” alla Sydney Opera House, con la regia di Gale Edwards. Durante la nostra conversazione abbiamo parlato tra l’altro anche di “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour” la serie annuale di produzioni sul palco galleggiante sulla baia di Sydney; dopo “Traviata”, “Carmen” e la “Madama Butterfly” de La Fura dels Baus, proprio pochi giorni fa ha debuttato con grande successo la sontuosa “Aida” di Gale Edwards.

       Conversazione con Lyndon Terracini (video: Giulio Tami)
    .

       Conversation with Lyndon Terracini (video: Giulio Tami)

     

    .
    Un frammento del video documentario di WINNERS – Brisbane Festival 2006
    .
    Madama Butterfly con la regia de La Fura dels Baus sulla baia di Sydney
    .
    .
    Extract from the video documentary of
    WINNERS – Brisbane Festival 2006
    .
    Madame Butterfly directed by La Fura dels Baus on the Sydney Harbour

     

    The performance venue as a communication centre

    in conversation with Lyndon Terracini

    Language: English

    In a way, theatre has always been that. Theatres are places where people went to see an opera, or a play, or a dance piece, and it was a gathering point too; and now that society has changed and technology has changed incredibly, it can also mean that what happens in that theatre at the same time can happen globally! So an audience all over the world can actually be part of that audience that is in a specific city. And I think – when we were talking about it in Brisbane we were both fascinated by it – it seems to me that the future… well, it’s about that, I mean. There have been things with symphony orchestra concerts online and so on and so on, which is part of that, but there is a much broader discussion to have, so that there is a complete connection from one performing arts space anywhere in the world to the rest of the world; and also, too, it’s about some sort of interaction, so that those people who are part of that audience, globally, can actually participate in what you are doing in that centre.

    There is this difficult period; I guess we can refer to it as a transition from where governments in the past were providing funds to maintain theatres, opera company, prosa theatres, dance, symphony orchestras and so on, and now a lot of governments are finding that they are short of money and so they look to reduce the budget they have for arts and cultural events. A lot of them are hoping that philantropists and the corporate sector will replace the government fundings. But at the moment we are actually between that period: there is not enough money from corporate sponsors and philantropists, and yet the government money is being reduced, all over the world. We have to get through that period; and my feeling too is that that requires more thought and better ideas about how we communicate with the public; a contemporary public, a public that is used to new technologies.

    With Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour it has been very interesting, because when I first looked at that site, it immediately said to me that this is actually about the culture of Sydney; and sitting there you look at the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Sydney Opera House and the skyline, and everything about it just says, this is in Sydney. And that was an important part of it. The other really important thing is – you mentioned the production of Butterfly that La Fura dels Baus, Alex Ollé, directed – it is easier for us to do a production that is a bit more edgy and contemporary when we do it on that stage than it is in the theatre, because the audience that’s coming is not a traditional opera audience, so they don’t have the same prejudices. So we are finding this new audience and as you said it’s about how you translate that audience into other things.

    That’s the dream: that we can take it to a place where the audience would come and see something that’s really about contemporary culture, that’s about their lives, that is happening now, with composers who finish the piece… last week!

    I mean, it’s crazy that we are not making new pieces that are going into the repertoire. And it’s not that there aren’t wonderful pieces, there are some fantastic pieces. But if we try to present to a – frankly – conservative opera-going public a new piece in a context where we would present nineteenth century opera, then it does not translate to it. But if we find a different context, so that they have a different way to looking at it, a different way of hearing it, then I think that will change.

    It’s important. It’s important to do it, full stop. But I think – it’s the case of a lot of your work, it has a very serious social context – and I think for us to find the right space, in Sydney or any city in the world, if that reflects the culture of that particular place, if it has a social relevance to that particular place, then the connection with the audience is a lot more… it’s broader, but it’s also more focused, because you’re working out who you are going to play to, in a contemporary society.

    Lyndon Terracini is the Artistic Director of Opera Australia, Australia’s national opera company. After a highly successful career as a singer, particularly in contemporary music, he was appointed Artistic Director of the Queensland Music Festival in Brisbane (where he programmed a Festival of exclusively XX century music) and then of the Brisbane Festival. Our collaboration started in 2003, when he invited me to conduct Heiner Goebbels’ “Surrogate Cities” at the QPAC in Brisbane; he later brought my “CREDO” to Australia and commissioned and produced “WINNERS”, premièred at the Brisbane Festival, before being performed at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. In 2011 he asked me to debut as conductor at the Sydney Opera House; the most prestigious projects we realised were the première of Verdi’s “Un Ballo in Maschera” directed by La Fura dels Baus and, recently, a Puccini celebration with “Tosca” directed by John Bell in Melbourne and a New Year’s Eve Gala with “La Bohème” at the Sydney Opera House, directed by Gale Edwards. During our conversation we spoke among other things about “Handa Opera on Sydney Harbour”, the yearly production on the floating stage on the Sydney Harbour. After “Traviata”, “Carmen” and “Madame Butterfly” by La Fura dels Baus, just a couple of days ago the sumptuous “Aida” directed by Gale Edwards had its hugely successful opening night.

  • 08-11-2014

    I Pet Shop Boys, la corazzata Potemkin e un palazzo nella Prager Strasse

    Bandiera EN

     English version

    Conversazione con Markus Rindt

    Lingua: tedesco

    …e abbiamo utilizzato tutto il palazzo. Immaginatevi: sulla facciata del palazzo c’era un enorme schermo di proiezione, e attorno allo schermo c’era l’orchestra, qui i violini, qui le viole, qui i violoncelli e qui i contrabbassi; tutto intorno. E ancora più in alto, sopra l’orchestra, appena sotto il tetto, in due balconi, in un balcone c’erano i Pet Shop Boys e nell’altro balcone c’era la tromba solista. Il tutto doveva naturalmente anche essere diretto, e c’era una piattaforma sostenuta da una gru con un braccio retrattile, ad un’altezza di 35 metri, e su quella piattaforma il direttore Jonathan Stockhammer doveva dirigere. Immaginatevi la sera del concerto, l’illuminazione, la proiezione del film, il grattacielo era illuminato in modo da sembrare un’enorme nave; e 30.000 persone là sotto a guardare… per il pubblico deve essere stata un’esperienza straordinaria.   

    E’ tipico per noi il fatto che cerchiamo sempre di realizzare progetti interculturali, o progetti di interesse politico, o di interesse tecnologico, multimediale; e già tempo prima avevamo avuto l’idea di filmare il direttore d’orchestra con una camera nascosta. Avevamo fatto molte ipotesi diverse, per esempio la metropolitana di Berlino, che il direttore si trovi là e diriga, ma che non si veda che viene ripreso; che la gente gli passi accanto ma non gli presti attenzione; che venga fatta una ripresa tale da poter essere utilizzata dal vivo per l’orchestra che si trova a Dresda, ma senza che la gente se ne accorga. Poi abbiamo pensato, portiamolo ancora più lontano, su un’isola, per esempio a Londra. Alla fine abbiamo deciso di piazzarlo in mezzo ad altri musicisti da strada, nella South Bank, sulla riva del Tamigi!   

    [Invece nel progetto “Telecomando”] non è il direttore d’orchestra ad essere altrove; il direttore è nella sala da concerto, circondato da schermi televisivi piazzati esattamente nelle stesse posizioni dove normalmente siederebbero i musicisti: davanti i primi e secondi violini, le viole, i celli, i bassi; dietro i legni, gli ottoni e le percussioni, ma ogni singolo musicista appare in uno schermo, collegato con la sala da un filo immaginario, ma in realtà è a casa sua. In origine, proprio all’inizio, avevo addirittura l’idea che fosse un’orchestra di ologrammi, che in ciascuna posizione il musicista venisse proiettato in modo da comparire in forma di ologramma. Sarebbe stato interessante lavorare su una situazione del genere dal punto di vista videotecnico. Ma è ancora impossibile. E’ possibile lavorare con ologrammi, ma è finanziariamente estremamente dispendioso, e ologrammi in movimento non sono ancora veramente possibili.

    Markus Rindt è il fondatore e direttore generale e artistico dei Dresdner Sinfoniker, un’orchestra creata circa quindici anni fa a Dresda che esegue esclusivamente musica del XX e XXI secolo. In questa conversazione parla di tre progetti tipici della drammaturgia dell’orchestra: la cosiddetta “Hochhaussymphonie”, ossia la “Sinfonia del Grattacielo”, dove i Pet Shop Boys e i Dresdner Sinfoniker hanno eseguito una nuova colonna sonora de “La corazzata Potemkin” con l’orchestra sparsa tra i balconi di un grattacielo della Prager Strasse, disposta attorno ad un enorme schermo sul quale veniva proiettato il film di Eisenstein; il “Ferndirigat”, ossia la “Direzione a distanza”, con Michael Helmrath che, dalla South Bank di Londra, dirigeva dal vivo l’orchestra che si trovava nel Kulturpalast di Dresda; e il progetto “Telecomando”, ancora in via di sviluppo, che, al contrario, prevede che il direttore d’orchestra si trovi solo nella sala da concerto, circondato da schermi dai quali ognuno dei componenti dell’orchestra, da casa propria, suona in diretta la propria parte.

        Conversazione con Markus Rindt – Dresdner Sinfoniker
    .

    Markus-Rindt-play

        Conversation with Markus Rindt – Dresdner Sinfoniker
    .
    Pet Shop Boys/Dresdner Sinfoniker
    La corazzata Potemkin
    .
    .
    Dresdner Sinfoniker – direzione a distanza
    Pet Shop Boys play Dresdner Sinfoniker play
    .
    Pet Shop Boys/Dresdner Sinfoniker
    Battleship Potemkin
    .
    Dresdner Sinfoniker – remote conducting

     

    The Pet Shop Boys, the battleship Potemkin and a building in the Prager Strasse 

    In conversation with Markus Rindt

    Language: German

    …and we used the whole building. Imagine that: there was a huge projection screen on the façade of the building, with an orchestra around the screen, the violins here, the cellos and basses there; all around it. Higher up, above the orchestra, right under the roof, were the Pet Shop Boys in a terrace and the solo trumpet in the terrace right next to them. And of course, the whole thing had to be conducted: there was a platform held up by a crane with a retractable arm, where the conductor Jonathan Stockhammer was to conduct. Imagine the night of the show, the lights, the projected film, the skyscraper was lighted so as to make it look like a huge ship; and 30.000 people were watching from the square below…it must have been an amazing experience for the audience.

    One of our main features is that we always strive to realise intercultural projects, projects that have a political relevance, or a technological and multimedia aspect; long before that we’d had the idea to film the conductor with a hidden camera. We had a number of possibilities, in the Berlin Underground for example, where the conductor would be filmed conducting, without showing the camera; in this way people would pass by him without giving any special attention; so that a shot would be made and then used live with the orchestra in Dresden, without people noticing. Then we thought, let’s take him further away, on an island, in London. In the end we placed him among other street musicians on the South Bank, on the Thames!

     [In the “Telecomando” project instead] the conductor is not the one who gets displaced; the conductor is in the concert hall, surrounded by TV screens that are right where the performers would sit: first and second violins in front, the violas, cellos and basses; then the woodwinds, brass and percussions, but every musician only appears on the screen, connected through an imaginary wire, while he or she is actually at home. Originally, right at the beginning, I even thought of an orchestra of holograms, so that each musician would be a hologram projected on his/her seat. It would have been interesting to work on this kind of situation under the video-technical point of view. But this is not yet possible. It is possible to work with holograms, but it is extremely expensive, and moving holograms are not yet really possible.

    Markus Rindt is the founder, general manager and artistic director of the Dresdner Sinfoniker, an orchestra that was created 15 years ago in Dresden, exclusively devoted to the music of the XX and XXI century. In our conversation he talks about three projects that are typical of the dramaturgy of this orchestra: the so-called “Hochhaussymphonie”, which means the “Symphony of the Skyscraper”, where the Pet Shop Boys with the Dresdner Sinfoniker performed a new soundtrack to the “Battleship Potemkin” with the orchestra scattered on the terraces and balconies of a skyscraper on the Prager Strasse in Dresden, around a huge screen where Eisenstein’s film was projected; the “Ferndirigat”, which means “remote conducting”, with Michael Helmrath in London’s South Bank conducting the orchestra in the Dresden Kulturpalast; and the “Telecomando” (“Remote Control”) project, still being developed, where, in reverse, the conductor is alone in the concert hall while each member of the orchestra plays his/her part live while at home.
     

     

  • 10-10-2014

    Il Senso del Luogo

    Bandiera EN

     English version

    di Andrea Molino

    Nel 2000 Simon Rattle ha diretto i Wiener Philharmoniker nella 9. Sinfonia di Beethoven. Niente di particolare, in apparenza, se non che il concerto ha avuto luogo a Mauthausen. Se non mi sbaglio, Rattle ha eseguito lo stesso pezzo nuovamente, con i Berliner Philharmoniker, a Theresienstadt, o Terezin, il campo di concentramento “per artisti” creato da Goebbels come strumento di propaganda, per mostrare all’opinione pubblica internazionale come nei campi di concentramento gli internati, in particolare gli uomini di cultura,  potessero mantenere una parvenza di attività professionale. L’iniziativa è stata molto controversa; nell’intervista “Ode to Joy in Mauthausen”, consultabile sul sito del Guardian, Rattle racconta al giornalista Martin Kettle le motivazioni del progetto.

    Senza addentrarmi qui in quella polemica (sono in ogni caso uno strenuo difensore di quel progetto) non si può non notare come il luogo abbia avuto, in questo caso, una influenza fondamentale, e profondamente teatrale, sulla narrazione dell’esecuzione. Quel concerto è diventato, grazie alla scelta del luogo di esecuzione, un’affascinante e complessa presa di posizione non verbale, che secondo me dimostra pienamente la possibilità dell’arte di inserirsi in modo efficace nel dibattito sociale.

    Il contesto è parte del testo.

    Il luogo dove l’evento avviene ha influenza estetica, artistica e narrativa prima ancora che logistica sull’evento stesso. La Matthäus Passion di Bach eseguita in una cattedrale è un altro pezzo rispetto alla Matthäus Passion di Bach eseguita in una sala da concerto; e la 9. Sinfonia di Beethoven diretta da Rattle a Mauthausen è un altro pezzo rispetto alla 9. di Beethoven diretta da Karajan (in playback) alla Philharmonie di Berlino. Non comincio nemmeno a discutere il caso della 9. di Beethoven diretta da Furtwängler a Berlino nel 1942 di fronte ad Adolf Hitler e Joseph Goebbels, in occasione delle celebrazioni del compleanno del Führer…

    Wilhelm Furtwängler dirige la 9. Sinfonia di Beethoven per il compleanno di Hitler – Berlino, 19 Aprile 1942

    furtwangler 2 play 640 x 360

    Wilhelm Furtwängler conducts Beethoven’s 9. Symphony for Hitler’s birthday – Berlin, April 19, 1942

    The Sense of the Place

    by Andrea Molino

    In the year 2000 Simon Rattle conducted Beethoven’s 9th Symphony with the Vienna Philharmonic. Nothing out of the ordinary, it would seem, except for the fact that the concert took place in Mauthausen. If I recall correctly, Rattle conducted the same symphony with the Berlin Philharmonic in Theresenstadt, or Terezin, the concentration camp Goebbels had created for artists as a means of his propaganda, for the public eye to see how the internees, and especially those among them who were men of culture, could maintain some sort of professional life. Rattle’s initiative was very controversial: in the interview “Ode to Joy in Mauthausen”, that can be found on the Guardian’s website, Rattle tells journalist Martin Kettle his reasons for the project.

    Without delving into the controversy (in any case, I strongly support that project) it is impossible not to notice how that location had an impact, an essential influence, and a deeply theatrical one, on the narration of that performance. That concert, because of its location, has become a passionate and fascinating non-verbal stance which, in my opinion, fully demonstrates the possibilities for art to participate to the social debate.

    Context is part of the text.

    The location where the event takes place has an aesthetic, artistic and narrative (even more than logistic) influence on the event itself. Bach’s Matthäus Passion in a cathedral is a different piece from Bach’s Matthäus Passion performed in a concert hall; Beethoven’s 9th Symphony conducted by Rattle in Mauthausen is a different piece from Beethoven’s 9th Symphony conducted by Karajan (with playback) in Berlin’s Philharmonie.

    I will not even begin to discuss Beethoven’s 9th conducted by Furtwängler in 1942 in Berlin in front of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels, to celebrate the Führer’s birthday…

marzo: 2019
L M M G V S D
« Mar    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Logo coproduttori

© RAI 2013 - tutti i diritti riservati. P.Iva 06382641006 Engineered by RaiNet