Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [2] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [2] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [2] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 269668
                [name] => Mediavideo
                [slug] => mediavideo
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 24
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 108
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 269668
                [category_count] => 108
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Mediavideo
                [category_nicename] => mediavideo
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [1] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 449320
                [name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [slug] => per-forza-di-cose
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 151
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 60
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 449320
                [category_count] => 60
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => per forza di cose - a matter of things
                [category_nicename] => per-forza-di-cose
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
        [2] => WP_Term Object
            (
                [term_id] => 219613
                [name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [slug] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [term_group] => 0
                [term_taxonomy_id] => 2
                [taxonomy] => category
                [description] => 
                [parent] => 0
                [count] => 27
                [filter] => raw
                [cat_ID] => 219613
                [category_count] => 27
                [category_description] => 
                [cat_name] => Qui non c'è perché
                [category_nicename] => qui-non-ce-perche
                [category_parent] => 0
            )
    
    )
    
  • 07-11-2015

    Il suono collettivo

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    Fin da bambino sono stato istintivamente, emotivamente attratto dai suoni complessi, collettivi: le strida di uno stormo di uccelli, il pigolìo di un cesto pieno di pulcini, il grido e il canto più o meno sincronizzati di uno stadio colmo (e non ho nessun particolare interesse per lo sport!), la pioggia che batte su un tetto metallico… Come mi succede sempre con le cose che amo, non c’era nessun motivo razionale per questa mia attrazione; al contrario, è l’istintività della mia reazione a questa particolare categoria di suoni che mi ha portato, in seguito, a cercare di capire il perché di queste mie sensazioni.
    Di conseguenza è perdonabile l’ingenuità del mio entusiasmo quando, da ragazzo, nel pieno dell’ebbrezza del mio primo viaggio di studio a Parigi, ho letto in un volume acquistato in una libreria del VIème arrondissement queste parole:
    […] Per prima cosa gli eventi naturali come i colpi della grandine o della pioggia su superfici dure o ancora il canto delle cicale in un campo in piena estate. Questi eventi sonori globali sono fatti da migliaia di suoni isolati la cui moltitudine crea un evento sonoro nuovo sul piano dell’insieme. […] Tutti hanno osservato i fenomeni sonori di una grande folla di decine o centinaia di migliaia di persone durante le manifestazioni politiche. Il fiume umano scandisce uno slogan in un ritmo unanime. Poi alla testa della manifestazione viene lanciato un altro slogan, e si propaga verso la coda sostituendo il primo. In questo modo un’onda di transizione si propaga dalla testa alla coda. Il clamore riempie la città, la forza inibitrice della voce e del ritmo è al suo culmine. E’ un evento altamente potente e bello nella sua ferocia. Poi si produce lo scontro dei manifestanti con il nemico. Il ritmo perfetto dell’ultimo slogan si rompe in un ammasso di grida caotiche che, anch’esso, si propaga verso la coda. Immaginiamo inoltre il crepitìo di decine di mitragliatrici e il fischio dei proiettili che aggiungono la loro punteggiatura al disordine totale. Poi, rapidamente, la folle viene dispersa e all’inferno sonoro e visuale succede una calma lacerante, piena di disperazione, di morte e di polvere.
    Iannis Xenakis, Musiques Formelles
    In effetti tra i compositori che nel ventesimo secolo con più precisione si sono dedicati a questo aspetto ci sono proprio Iannis Xenakis e György Ligeti. Le “micropolifonie” di Ligeti sono un mezzo semplicissimo e straordinariamente efficace di organizzare e gestire un grande numero di piccoli eventi sonori, inserendoli in modo organico nel suono complessivo; Xenakis invece vi si è dedicato in modo forse ancora più intenso e specifico, con risultati musicali a volte meno immediati, ma con l’enorme merito di introdurre modi nuovi e più efficaci di pensare a questo tipo di eventi, per esempio attraverso l’uso della teoria della probabilità.
    Sicuramente questo è uno dei motivi principali per i quali il mio strumento è… l’orchestra: non esiste null’altro che possa offrire la possibilità di costruire con precisione e flessibilità nemmeno paragonabili un’organismo sonoro complesso e – appunto – collettivo.
    Un altro aspetto per me affascinante è che i suoni collettivi sono, per necessità logistica, distribuiti nello spazio. Ricordo con gioia un concerto dell’Orchestre Philharmonique de Bruxelles diretta dal visionario Michel Tabachnik, che prendendo spunto dalle indicazioni logistiche della partitura di Terretêkthor di Xenakis, aveva deciso di sparpagliare l’intera orchestra nello spazio vuoto delle Halles de Scharbeek a Bruxelles, sistemando inoltre alcune centinaia di sedie a sdraio nelle quali il pubblico poteva accomodarsi, trovandosi quindi in mezzo ai singoli strumentisti dell’orchestra. Il programma era estremamente variegato: oltre a Xenakis, c’erano alcune Canzoni e Sonate di Gabrieli, se non ricordo male nella trascrizione di Bruno Maderna, Lontano di Ligeti e l’Ouverture del Lohengrin di Wagner. Terrêtekthor veniva eseguito due volte, per permettere al pubblico di spostarsi e ascoltare il pezzo da due prospettive diverse. E’ uno dei concerti più interessanti ai quali abbia mai assistito; e la cosa per me paradossalmente più rivelatrice in quell’occasione è stata che, a mio parere, il pezzo che funzionava meglio in quel contesto era… Wagner. La sua scrittura orchestrale, estremamente omogenea e avvolgente, veniva esaltata dalla distribuzione nello spazio; al contrario, Xenakis e Ligeti risultavano in qualche modo più “frammentati”, rendendo peraltro possibile una affascinante serie di osservazioni nel momento in cui ci si spostava attraverso la sala.
    Ma questo tipo di intuizione musicale nasce ben prima di Ligeti e Xenakis. Tra i numerosi esempi disponibili vorrei scegliere Giuseppe Verdi quando già ne La Traviata, pochi istanti pima della morte di Violetta, fa suonare tutta l’orchestra, compresi ottoni, timpano e grancassa, il più piano possibile: “Questo squarcio benché a tutta orchestra dovrà eseguirsi pianissimo”. Non è per nulla una contraddizione: la tessitura, il colore di un pianissimo sono molto più densi, più intensi e più emotivamente coinvolgenti se il suono è eseguito collettivamente, mentre una riduzione dell’organico in quei punti avrebbe creato una trasparenza che, in quei casi, sarebbe stata di gran lunga meno efficace!

     

       La Brussels Philharmonic alle Halles de Schaarbeek a Bruxelles (foto: Virginie Schreyen)
    .

      The Brussels Philharmonic at the Halles de Schaarbeek in Brussels (photo: Virginie Schreyen)

     

    The collective sound

    Since I was a kid I instinctively, emotionally felt attracted by complex, collective sounds: the squeaking of a flock of birds, the cheeping of chicks in a basket, the more or less synchronized shouting and singing in a full stadium (and I’m not even into sports!), the rain on a metal roof…. As is usual with things I love, there was no rational cause for this attraction; on the contrary, the instinctiveness of my reaction to this kind of sounds led me to later investigate the reasons behind these feelings.
    I can therefore be forgiven my naive enthusiasm when, as a young man, in the exaltation of my first study trip to Paris, I found these words in a book bought in a bookshop in the VIème arrondissement:
    […] First of all, natural events such as the collision of hail or rain with hard surfaces, or the song of cicadas in a summer field. These sonic events are made out of thousands of isolated sounds; this multitude of sounds, seen as a totality, is a new sonic event. […] Everyone has observed the sonic phenomena of a political crowd of tens or hundreds of thousands of people. The human river shouts a slogan in a uniform rhythm. Then another slogan springs from the head of the demonstration; it spreads towards the tail replacing the first. A wave of transition thus passes from the head to the tail. The clamour fills the city, and the inhibiting force of voice and rhythm reaches a climax. It is an event of great power and beauty in its ferocity. Then the impact between the demonstrators and the enemy occurs. The perfect rhythm of the last slogan breaks up in a huge cluster of chaotic shouts, which also spreads to the tail. Imagine, in addition, the crackling of dozens of machine guns and the whistle of bullets adding their punctuations to this total disorder. The crowd is then rapidly dispersed, and after sonic and visual hell follows a detonating calm, full of despair, dust and death.
    Iannis Xenakis, Musiques Formelles
    Iannis Xenakis and György Ligeti are indeed among the 20th century composers who explored this aspect more specifically. Ligeti’s “micropolyphonies” are a very simple and extraordinarily effective means of organising a large number of small sound events, by inserting them organically in the resulting complex sound. Xenakis was, if possible, committed to an even more specific and intense investigation; his musical results were sometimes less immediate, but with the huge merit of introducing new and more effective ways of conceiving this kind of events, in particular through probability theory.
    This is certainly the reason why my main instrument is… the orchestra: nothing else can offer the opportunity to build a complex sound organism and, with unparalleled precision and flexibility, a collective one.

    Another fascinating aspect is that collective sounds are, for logistical reasons, spread out in space. I have a fond memory of a concert by the Brussels Philharmonic conducted by Michel Tabachnik who, following Xenakis’ indications in the score of Terretêkthor, decided to spread the whole orchestra in the empty space of the Halles de Scharbeek in Brussels, arranging hundreds of folding chairs for the audience, who would find themselves right next to individual orchestra musicians. It was an extremely varied programme: in addition to Xenakis there were some Canzoni e Sonate by Gabrieli, orchestrated by Maderna if I recall correctly, Ligeti’s Lontano and Wagner’s Lohengrin Ouverture. Terretêkthor was performed twice, to allow the audience to move and to listen to the piece from different sound perspectives. It was one of the most interesting concerts I ever sat through; and, paradoxically, the real revelation on that occasion was that the piece of music that worked out the best in that context was… Wagner. His orchestral writing, extremely homogeneous and enfolding, was enhanced by the spatial distribution, while Xenakis and Ligeti came out somehow as more “fragmented”, allowing nevertheless a fascinating series of observations as one moved through the hall.

    But we can find this kind of musical intuition long before Ligeti and Xenakis. Among the numerous examples I wish to single out Giuseppe Verdi in La Traviata: shortly before the death of Violetta, he has the whole orchestra, including brass, timpani and bassdrum, play as soft as possible: “This passage, although for the whole orchestra, will be performed pianissimo”. This is not a contradiction: the texture, the colour of a pianissimo are much more dense, stronger and emotionally captivating if the sound is performed collectively, while a thinning in the instrumentation would have created a transparency that, in that case, would have been way less effective!

  • 30-09-2015

    Il luogo dove avvengono le decisioni: l'arte e la polis

    Bandiera EN

     English version

     

    conversazione con Pietro Montani

    Lingua: italiano

    C’è la grande opportunità che si apre grazie alle nuove tecnologie per far diventare la natura già intimamente politica dell’arte, quando l’arte assolve davvero alla sua funzione, qualche cosa di più intimamente partecipativo. Naturalmente lo spettacolo, in particolare lo spettacolo teatrale, è sempre stato profondamente partecipativo; ma è tuttavia una partecipazione che si è consumata in senso fondamentalmente contemplativistico. C’è un modo di contemplare anche molto partecipato: si esce diversi dallo spettacolo a cui si ha partecipato con molta convinzione, facendo molta elaborazione personale, passionale, emotiva, eccetera. Si può uscire trasformati; ma si esce trasformati come soggetti. Più difficile è dire che quello spettacolo abbia effettivamente trasformato un pezzo di realtà. […] I partecipanti possono effettivamente introdurre qualcosa di determinante dentro l’opera, per esempio modificarla, modificarla a vari livelli, ma possono anche  costruire dei contesti di partecipazione che sono effettivamente “politici” nel senso dell’antica caratterizzazione di questa parola: il luogo dove avvengono le decisioni. Perché la “polis” non è tanto la città nel senso urbanistico moderno ma è lo spazio pubblico in cui si consumano decisioni importanti, in cui davvero la partecipazione cambia le decisioni; e così via.

    Io non finisco di stupirmi di quanto così timidi siano gli artisti… più che timidi, tradizionalisti: cioè legati a qualche cosa come la riproduzione dei vecchi problemi nelle nuove condizioni tecnologiche, piuttosto che fare apparire i nuovi problemi, una cosa che l’arte ha fatto sempre, proprio per sua natura, quella di… anticipare. 

    Pensa che cosa sarebbe possibile se a qualcuno fosse venuto in mente di fare un uso un po’ più spregiudicato dei famosi Google Glass; questo device mi sembrava e mi sembra tuttora di straordinarie opportunità. Ma non solo il device non ha avuto successo nel mercato, ma questo c’era da aspettarselo; soprattutto anche in fase sperimentale è stato utilizzato infinitamente al di sotto delle sue potenzialità. […] Quando è stato utilizzato in modo immediato, soprattutto per lavorare sui rapporti di reciprocità, pensa cosa potrebbe significare, durante uno spettacolo che avesse le sufficienti infrastrutture per accogliere questi interventi, una visione stereoscopica dello spettacolo stesso grazie al fatto che una quarantina, una cinquantina di spettatori potrebbero avere un Google Glass e intervenire, perché Google Glass non è soltanto un recettore ma qualcosa che può produrre dentro l’immagine… insomma, si tratta davvero di, come dire, liberare la fantasia ed essere più spregiudicati.  

    Pensa tu se questi spettatori si trovassero all’interno di una manifestazione politica in senso tradizionale. Uno degli esempi che faccio nel mio libro è quello delle controversissime piazze della Primavera Araba; pensa a che cosa potrebbe essere per noi, per il futuro e per gli usi che se ne sarebbero potuti fare di queste piazze, di ciò che è accaduto in queste piazze, se fossero state percorse da cento manifestanti muniti di un’apparecchiatura di quel genere, cioè di una tecnologia indossabile capace di riprendere e di introdurre riprese. Questo significa che verrebbe di colpo riqualificato il lavoro di ricostruzione del significato politico di alcuni eventi che hanno un carattere, tuttora, sommamente opaco. […] Ho in mente in particolare, un paio d’anni fa con i miei studenti abbiamo fatto un seminario su questo; uno o due film di Piazza Tahrir, quella egiziana, che abbiamo visto, ci erano sembrati particolarmente insoddisfacenti non tanto perché non fossero qualitativamente vivaci, emotivi, importanti, ma perché tu sentivi proprio che avresti avuto bisogno di una maggiore condizione stereoscopica, cioè di vedere di più, di vedere la piazza in modo più capillare e intersecato.

    [Tziga Vertov] è stato quello che ha visto più lontano di tutti. Oggi davvero siamo in grado di dirlo. È stato necessario un cinquantennio per ricominciare a prendere contatto con questo grandissimo pioniere. In una frase bellissima di cui non dimentico mai il tono sconsolato Vertov dice: “Per tutta la vita ho costruito una locomotiva, ma mi sono accorto che mi mancava la rete ferroviaria”. Capisci? La “rete” gli mancava…! È Vertov che ha anticipato. Sì, naturalmente, quello che ci siamo appena detti, sul piano di una struttura che è ancora pensata in senso fondamentalmente lineare, non come un ipertesto ma in modo lineare, Vertov l’aveva anticipata. Per esempio lui pensa a questo suo film del ’24, “Kinoglaz”, “Cine-occhio”, come ad un testo interminabile che può irradiarsi da centri di significato evidenziati dal film stesso, per esempio con le didascalie, nei modi più diversi. Lì ci troviamo di fronte a qualcosa che è interattivo – profondamente, costitutivamente – e anche autopoietico. E lì mancava, effettivamente, la rete, la famosa “rete ferroviaria” che oggi abbiamo.

     

    Pietro Montani, filosofo, ha insegnato Estetica, come professore associato, nella Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell’Università di Urbino dal 1987 al 1992. Nel 1993 è stato chiamato, come professore associato di Estetica, dalla Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell’Università “la Sapienza” di Roma, dove attualmente insegna presso il dipartimento di Studi Filosofici ed Epistemologici. Ha compiuto diversi studi nell’ambito della teoria estetica, con particolare riguardo alle problematiche di carattere linguistico e alle implicazioni dell’uso delle nuove tecnologie in campo comunicativo ed artistico. Nella nostra conversazione siamo partiti dal suo ultimo libro, “Tecnologie della sensibilità – Estetica e immaginazione interattiva”, per discutere del ruolo intimamente “politico” dell’arte in generale e del teatro in particolare; parlando di Google Glass, della Primavera Araba e di Piazza Tahrir, per terminare con Tziga Vertov, il grande regista russo che Pietro apprezza con passione e intensità e che ha più volte trattato in diverse occasioni.

     

       Conversazione con Pietro Montani
    .

       Conversation with Pietro Montani

     

    .
    Tziga Vertov, L’uomo con la macchina da presa
    .
    Il Cairo, Momamed Mahmoud Street (Piazza Tahrir), 20 novembre 2011
    .
    .
    Tziga Vertov, Man With a Movie Camera
    .
    Cairo, Momamed Mahmoud Street (Tahrir Square), November 20, 2011

     

    Where decisions are made: Art and the Polis

    in conversation with Pietro Montani

    Language: Italian

    There’s this great opportunity opened by new technologies: to make the intimately political nature of art – when art really fulfills its task – something more intimately participatory. Obviously performance arts, and theatre in particular, were always participatory, but this participation was always basically a contemplative approach. There is also a kind of participatory contemplation: you are changed by a performance that you watch with great conviction, with a passionate personal, and emotional, elaboration. You can be transformed by that, as a subject. It is more difficult to state that a performance changed a part of reality. […] The participants can indeed give a crucial contribution to a work, even change it, at various levels, as well as build participatory contexts that can be termed “political” in the originary meaning of the word: the place where decisions are taken. Because the “polis” is not so much the city – in the modern, “urban” sense, but the public space where relevant issues are debated, where participation really changes the resulting decisions; and so forth.

    I never cease being amazed at how shy artists are… or rather, traditionalists: I mean tied to things like reproducing old problems in new technological contexts, rather than facing new problems, something art has always done – by its very nature – to… anticipate.

    Imagine what could be possible is somebody thought of some more open-minded use of the famous Google Glass; this device seemed, and still seems to me, an extraordinary opportunity. Alas, the device not only was not commercially successful, which could be expected; but, especially in its experimental phase, it was used way below its potential. […] When used in an immediate way, to work on reciprocal relations, think what it could mean for a performance – if it had the infrastructure to include it – to have a stereoscopic vision of the show itself, thanks to 40 or 50 people in the audience with Google Glass who could intervene, because Google Glass is not only a recipient, but something that can create within the image… in short, it is all about, so to speak, freeing your fantasy and being more open-minded.

    Imagine one of these spectators in a traditional political rally. One of the examples in my book is about those extremely controversial public places during the Arab Spring; think about what it could mean for us, for the future, and could those places have been, what happened on those places, if they were peopled by a hundred demonstrators with that kind of device, a technology capable of shooting and transmitting video. We would abruptly become able to reassess the whole political meaning of some events that have remained, even up to now, largely opaque. […]
    I am thinking in particular – a couple of years ago we did a seminary on it with my students – about one or two videos from Tahrir Square, in Egypt, which had seemed to us especially unsatisfactory, not so much because they were not qualitatively intense, emotional, important, but because you felt precisely that you needed a more stereoscopic situation, to see more, to see the square in a more detailed and intersected way.

    [Tziga Vertov] was the one who saw the furthest. We can say that today. Fifty years were necessary before we reconnect to this great pioneer. In a beautiful phrase – I never forget its desolate tone – Vertov says: “I spent my whole life building a locomotive, but only now do I realise that the rail network is missing”. Do you see? He missed the “network”…! Vertov was ahead of his time. Of course, what we just said about a structure that is still conceived in a basically linear way, not as a hypertext, but in a linear way, that he foresaw. For example, in “Kinoglaz” from 1924, “Movie-eye”, he conceived an endless text that can derive from various meaningful nodes in the movie, for example through subtitles, or in other ways. There we find something interactive – deeply and constitutively – and also autopoietic. And there, indeed, what was missing, was the network, that famous “rail network” that we have today.

     

    Pietro Montani, philosopher, taught Aesthetics, in the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy of the University of Urbino, and in the University “La Sapienza” in Rome, where he actually teaches in the department of Philosophy and Epistemology. He researched various ambits of Aesthetic Theory, in particular the linguistic issues and implications of the use of new technologies in the artistic and communicative fields. In our conversation we started from his latest book “Technologies of Sensitivity – Aesthetics and interactive imagination”, to discuss the eminently “political” role of art in general, and of theatre in particular; discussing Google Glass, the Arab Spring and Tahrir Square, to conclude with Tziga Vertov, the great Russian film director that Pietro admires passionately, and whose work he repeatedly investigated.

     

     

gennaio: 2019
L M M G V S D
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Logo coproduttori

© RAI 2013 - tutti i diritti riservati. P.Iva 06382641006 Engineered by RaiNet